A new view of society: or, Essays on the principle of the formation of the human character. By one of his majesty's justices of peace [R. Owen. Pt.1,2. Pt.2, numbered Essay 2nd, is a proof copy].

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Page i - Any general character, from the best to the worst, from the most ignorant to the most enlightened, may be given to any community, even to the world at large, by the application of proper means; which means are to a great extent at the command and under the control of those who have influence in the affairs of men.
Page 46 - Falsehood and deception met with a similar fate; they were held in disgrace ; their practical evils were shortly explained; and every countenance was given to truth and open conduct. The pleasure and substantial advantages derived from the latter, soon overcame the impolicy, error, and consequent misery, which the former mode of acting had created.
Page 45 - ... different conduct was inculcated by those instructed for the purpose, who had the best powers of reasoning among themselves. They were at the same time instructed how to direct their industry in legal and useful occupations, by which, without danger or disgrace, they could really earn more than they had previously obtained by dishonest practices. Thus the difficulty of committing the crime was increased, the detection afterwards rendered more easy, the habit of honest industry formed, and the...
Page 37 - ... became agents not to be governed contrary to their own inclinations. Mr. Dale's principal avocations were at a distance from the works, which he seldom visited more than once for a few hours in three or four months; he was therefore under the necessity of committing the management of the establishment to various servants with more or less power. Those who have a practical knowledge of mankind will readily anticipate the character which a population so collected and constituted would acquire....
Page 45 - He soon discovered that theft was extended through almost all the rami. fications of the community, and the receipt of stolen goods through all the country around. To remedy this evil, not one legal punishment was inflicted — not one individual imprisoned — even for an hour ; but checks and other regulations of prevention, were introduced. A short plain explanation of the immediate benefits they would derive from a different conduct was inculcated by those instructed for the purpose, who had...
Page 37 - ... the establishment to various servants with more or less power. Those who have a practical knowledge of mankind will readily anticipate the character which a population so collected and constituted would acquire. It is therefore scarcely necessary to state, that the community by degrees was formed under these circumstances into a very wretched society: every man did that which was right in his own eyes, and vice and immorality prevailed to a monstrous extent.
Page 32 - How much longer shall we continue to allow generation after generation to be taught crime from their infancy, and when so taught, hunt them like beasts of the forest, until they are entangled beyond escape in the toils and nets of the law?
Page 47 - That in future, they should endeavour to use the same active exertions to make each other happy and comfortable, as they had hitherto done to make each other miserable ; and, by carrying this short memorandum in their mind, and applying it on all occasions, they would soon render that place a Paradise, which, from the most mistaken principles of action, they now made the abode of misery.
Page 9 - That any character — from the best to the worst, from the most ignorant to the most enlightened — may be given to any community, even to the world at large, by applying certain means, which are to a great extent at the command and under the control, or easily made so, of those who possess the government of nations.
Page 40 - Their labour through the day and their education at night became so irksome, that numbers of them continually ran away, and almost all looked forward with impatience and anxiety to the expiration of their apprenticeship of seven, eight, and nine years, which generally expired when they were from thirteen to fifteen years old. At this period of life, unaccustomed to provide for themselves, and unacquainted with the world, they usually went to Edinburgh or Glasgow, where boys and girls were soon assailed...

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