A Note on Bookbinding

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W.H.Smith and son, 1904 - Bookbinding - 26 pages
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Page 17 - ... when the manufacture of leather was comparatively simple, a bookbinder might reasonably be expected to know enough of the processes employed to be able to select his leather. But now so complicated is the manufacture, and so many are the factors to be considered, that an expert should be employed. " The committee have satisfied themselves that it is possible to test any leather in such a way as to guarantee its suitability for bookbinding. They have not come to any decision as to the desirability...
Page 16 - ... used for binding books is less durable than that employed fifty years ago, and at previous times. They believe that there ought to be no difficulty in providing leather at the present time as good as any previously made, and they hope that the instructions laid down in the Report of the Sub-Committee, will result in the production of such leather. 2. They think that the modern methods of bookbinding are, to some extent, answerable for the lessened permanence of modern bindings. The practice of...
Page 15 - The committee, which was formed in 19oo, appointed two sub-committees, the first of which was appointed to visit a number of libraries, and to ascertain the comparative durability of the various book-binding leathers used at different periods and preserved under different conditions. The second sub-committee was appointed to deal with the scientific side of the matter, to ascertain the cause of any deterioration noticed and if possible to suggest methods for its prevention in future.
Page 16 - Committee have arrived, may be summarised as follows : — 1. They consider that the general belief that modern bookbinding leather is inferior to that formerly used, is justified, and that the leather now used for binding books is less durable than that employed fifty years ago, and at previous times. They believe that there ought to be no difficulty in providing leather at the present time as good as any previously made, and they hope that the instructions laid down in the Report of the Sub-Committee,...
Page 18 - All sheets broken at the back to be made sound with guards. Any single leaves or plates to be guarded round adjoining sections. Folded plates to be guarded with linen at folds. No pasting-on to be allowed. End Papers. — End papers not to be pasted on or overcast, but to be made with stout linen joint and sewn on as a section. Some system of folding or zigzaging which allows a little play without danger of breaking away is advocated. End papers to be made of good paper. Sewing. — Sewing to be...
Page 16 - I., ought to result in a greater permanence of the books treated. (3) They consider that the conditions under which books are best preserved are now fairly well understood, except that the injurious effect of light on leather has not previously been appreciated. They are satisfied that gas fumes are the most injurious of all the influences to which books are subjected. They consider that with proper conditions of ventilation, temperature and dryness, books may be preserved without deterioration for...
Page 20 - ... arrangement at one or two of the libraries visited, and it seemed that a great saving of the binding resulted from the use. Note. — That manuscripts on vellum, or books of special value will, of course, require special bindings designed to meet the special conditions. SUGGESTED SPECIFICATION FOR ORDINARY LIBRARY BINDING. Sheets and Plates. — All sheets broken at the back to be made sound with guards, any single leaves or plates to be guarded round adjoining sections. Folded plates to be guarded...
Page 21 - split boards " like those the vellum binders use. Straw board lined with a thin black board liner. Cutting or Treatment of Edges. — To depend on orders. Attaching Slips. — Slips to be pasted on to waste end papers, which should be cut off about two inches from the back and inserted with slips in the centre of split board. The board to be left about Jth inch from the back of the book to form a French joint.
Page 22 - ... the shelf, or in cases where the expenses of a worked headband is thought to be too great, a piece of string may be inserted into the fold of the leather at the head or tail. Covering. — Leather not to be unduly pared down. The French joint should make it possible to use far thicker leather than is usual. As there are no raised bands on the back the leather need not be unduly stretched in covering. For small books leather from comparatively small skins that will need but little paring should...
Page 15 - The conclusions at which the committee have arrived may be summarised as follows :— (1) They consider that the general belief that modern bookbinding leather is inferior to that formerly used is justified, and that the leather now used for binding books is less durable than that employed fifty years ago, and at previous times. They believe that there ought to be no difficulty in providing leather at the present time as good as any previously made, and they hope that the...

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