A paralell of governments: or, A politicall discourse upon seven positions, tending to the peace of England, and preservation of the citie of London

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Page 12 - ... into a wicked course of government, they thought it best to fortify themselves with a sure guard, ere they brake out into those disorders which they must needs commit for the establishing of their authority. Wherefore despatching two of their own company to Sparta, they informed the Lacedaemonians, that it was the full intent of the thirty to keep the city free from all rebellious motions, to which purpose it behoved them to cut off such as were seditious, and therefore desired the Lacedaemonians...
Page 12 - ... ordered, were become subject. But these thirty, having so great power in their hands, were more careful to hold it, than to deserve it by faithful execution of that which was committed to them in trust. Therefore apprehending such troublesome fellows as were odious to the city, though not punishable therefore by law, they condemned them to death ; which proceeding was by all men highly approved, who considered their lewd conditions, but did not withal bethink themselves, how easy a thing it would...
Page 12 - ... apprehending such troublesome fellows as were odious to the city, though not punishable therefore by law, they condemned them to death ; which proceeding was by all men highly approved, who considered their lewd conditions, but did not withal bethink themselves how easy a thing it would be unto these thirty men to take away the lives of innocents, by calling them perturbers of the peace, or what else they listed, when condemnation, without due trial and proof, had been once well allowed. Having...
Page 13 - ... out of the catalogue than any other man's, upon which consideration he advised them all to conceive no otherwise of his case than as of their own, who were liable to the same form of proceeding ; but (every man choosing rather to preserve his own life by silence, than presently to draw upon himself the danger which as yet concerned him little, and perhaps would never come near him) the tyrants, interpreting silence as consent, condemned him forthwith, and compelled him to drink poison. SECT....

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