A Philosophy of Therapeutics: The Foundation of which Rests Upon the Two Postulates: First, that it is the Human Organism that is the Active Factor in the Healing of the Sick, and Not Drugs, and Second, that There are Two Therapeutic Laws

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Nunn, 1904 - Homeopathy - 336 pages
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Page 228 - And they believe him !— oh ! the lover may Distrust that look which steals his soul away ; — The babe may cease to think that it can play With heaven's rainbow ;— alchymists may doubt The shining gold their crucible gives out ; — But Faith, fanatic Faith, once wedded fast To some dear falsehood, hugs it to the last.
Page 192 - Emotions upon sensation, exciting, as stated at the commencement, ordinary sensations, excessive and morbid sensations, or suspending them altogether. 1. Thought strongly directed to any part tends to increase its vascularity, and consequently its sensibility. Associated with a powerful emotion, these effects are more strikingly shown. And, when not directed to any special part, an excited emotional condition induces a general sensitiveness to impressions — an intolerance of noise, for example,...
Page 193 - There is no sensation, whether general or special, excited by agents acting upon the body from without, which cannot be excited also from within by emotional states affecting the sensory centres; such sensation being referred by the mind to the point at which the nerve terminates in the body.
Page xxvi - The great end and object of the physician's efforts should be "the greatest good to the patient." 2. The rule of conduct of physician and patient, and of physicians toward each other, should be the GOLDEN RULE, "As ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.
Page 156 - In the ankle and knee-joints tearing, only when moving," "the pains in the foot are aggravated by movement" and "the nocturnal pains only become tolerable when he walks about," "severe tearing in the arms and legs, owing to which he cannot lie on the side, where it tears; it becomes most tolerable by moving about the part where the tearing pain is"; "great inclination to sleep...
Page 271 - When taken in quantities just sufficient to produce sensible physiological effects, Strychnia induces a feeling of restlessness, perhaps accompanied by trembling in the limbs, and some stiffness in the neck and jaws. When a somewhat larger amount has been given, there may be general muscular twitchings and startings, with stiffness and stricture of the throat and chest; formications or other abnormal sensations under the skin may or may not be present.
Page 85 - A healthy man was injected with five cubic centimetres of diphtheria antitoxin for prophylactic purposes. Five days later he suffered from malaise, chilliness, and vertigo. He was faint and was . put to bed. Chilliness and vertigo continued; vomiting occurred. There was great prostration, and oedema of the uvula and pharynx. Urine thick, high-colored, with almost complete suppression. Pulse rapid and irregular. At the end of the first day general glandular enlargement, which persisted ten days. Patient...
Page 218 - In any line of work the best results are secured only through the systemization of the principles and facts upon which that work depends. Nothing has yet controverted the self-evident proposition that a straight line is the shortest distance between any two points. To reach a goal means the accomplishment of a purpose, and the accomplishment of a purpose means the establishment of a sequence of ideas, conditions or things, which connect the start and the finish by the line of intent ; and, to make...
Page iii - RESTS UPON THE TWO POSTULATES: FIRST, THAT IT IS THE HUMAN ORGANISM THAT IS THE ACTIVE FACTOR IN THE HEALING OF THE SICK, AND NOT DRUGS, AND SECOND, THAT THERE ARE TWO THERAPEUTIC LAWS :: :: :: :: :: :: . BY ELDRIDGE C.
Page 179 - In what particulars has the proving of drugs deviated from the rules laid down by Hahnemann in the Organon, and in what particulars do Hahnemann's rules and directions for proving drugs differ from, or fall short of, those required by the methods and precautions of modern scientific research?

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