A Physical Theory of Electrification

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The University, 1911 - Electricity - 69 pages
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Page 69 - These appearances we attempt to account for thus: We suppose, as aforesaid, that electrical fire is a common element, of which every one of the three persons above mentioned has his equal share, before any operation is begun with the tube. A, who stands on wax and rubs the tube, collects the electrical fire from himself into the glass; and his communication with the common stock being cut off by the wax, his body is not again immediately supply'd.
Page 68 - Electrical matter differs from common matter in this, that the parts of the latter mutually attract, those of the former mutually repel each other. Hence the appearing divergency in a stream of electrified effluvia. 4. But though the particles of electrical matter do repel each other, they are strongly attracted by all other matter*.
Page 69 - C, standing on the floor, both appear to be electrized; for he, having only the middle quantity of electrical fire, receives a spark upon approaching B, who has an over quantity ; but gives one to A , who has an under quantity. If A and B approach to touch each other, the spark is stronger, because the difference between them is greater. After...
Page 68 - But though the particles of electrical matter do repel each other, they are strongly attracted by all other matter. "5. From these three things, the extreme subtility of the electrical matter, the mutual repulsion of its parts, and the strong attraction between them and other matter, arise this effect, that, when a quantity of electrical matter is applied to a mass of common matter, of any bigness or length, within our observation (which hath not already got its quantity) it is immediately and equally...
Page 68 - This ingenious author, from a great variety of curious and welladapted experiments, is of opinion, that the electrical matter consists of particles extremely subtile ; since it can permeate common matter, even the densest metals, with such ease and freedom, as not to receive any perceptible resistance...
Page 69 - If A and B approach to touch each other, the spark is stronger, because the difference between them is greater; after such touch there is no spark between either of them and C, because the electrical fire in all is reduced to the original equality.
Page 7 - The Earth is in fact a target exposed to cathode rays, or rather to electrons emitted by a hot body, viz., the sun. ******* The gradual accumulation of negative electricity by the earth is a natural consequence of this electric bombardment extending to greater distances across space, where no residual matter exists; and the fact that the torrent of particles constitutes an electric current of fair strength, gives an easy explanation of one class of magnetic storms ; these storms having long been...
Page 37 - Some Observations Upon the Conductivity of a Copper Wire in Various Dielectrics.
Page 7 - ... about which there is no ether strain at all. When we consider the experimental evidence for and against the electric neutrality of the earth we are at once struck by the fact that the electrical condition of the earth is apparently not even stable. For example, radioactive changes are taking place in the earth, and apparently in the atmosphere. There are indications that these changes have been more important in the past than they are at the present time. In some of these changes the negative...
Page 67 - Three uniform spheres, each of radius a and of mass m, attract one another according to the law of the inverse square of the distance.

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