A picturesque journey to the North Cape

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Page 95 - A dungeon horrible, on all sides round As one great furnace flam'd, yet from those flames No light, but rather darkness visible Serv'd only to discover sights of woe...
Page 62 - This mountain is the farthest point to which a road has hitherto been conducted, and it becomes necessary to change the mode of conveyance, from horses to the boats of the country, a tedious process, of which we have somewhat too much. The rivers here flow from the north, and the ascent is of course...
Page 61 - It was now midnight, and the sun seemed td touch the summit of a lofty mountain, which partly concealed it. Nature, in suspense, appeared to wait the decision of this luminary, -whether he would abandon the earth to the shades of night, or, resuming his beneficent course, he should continue to illuminate it. We remarked the shadow of one rock upon another, in order to watch the sun's motion, and in a few minutes we observed that the shaidow had vanished, and consequently that the •gun was rising.
Page 121 - The traditions of the Fins, and the few which the Laplanders retain, confirm the opinion, that the latter have formerly possessed Finland, and have been expelled by the present occupiers.* Thus their domains have receded from the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia, beyond the po-> lar circle, and are every way contracted by the colonists, who settle in their countries.
Page 120 - Irf general, I think that inquiries as to the resemblance of languages may throw much light on history, and prove as well the affinities, as the ancient connection between people now far apart, and mutually ignorant of each other. But when the origin of nations is in question, if this conformity alone is to be found on one side, and on the other physical relations, as the same characteristic features, the same form, &c. I think one cannot mistake...
Page 149 - ... rolling fastens the skirt on so that it won't fall off and won't pull apart, and the only way to get it off is to unroll it. Besides this skirt, the natives have long hair, and that completes their apparel. When they want 'to sit down they squat like monkeys, their knees on a level with their chins. The dress of the women is the same as that of the men, but they are vain creatures and wear much jewelry.
Page 217 - At length, amongst some rugged mountains, we found a tent of Laplanders, on the banks of a cascade which watered a verdant hill. The tents were of coarse linen, stretched round by stakes driven into the earth, in the form of a truncated cone, at the top of which is an outlet for the smoke. In winter, the tents of the rich Laplanders are covered with thick woollen stuff or rein-deer...
Page 42 - His education was chiefly directed to the sciences, to which he manifested an early attachment ; and his progress was such that at the age of twenty-one, he was chosen as the co-operator of Maupertuis, in the measure of a degree of the meridian at the polar circle. At the period when the errors in Flamsteed's catalogue of the stars...
Page 226 - The boatmen then told us, in a confused manner, that, during along nap, we-had passed several promontories, and latterly a small gulf, on the shores of which were some huts, and before them a rocky point nearly resembling the North Cape, but which we still saw to the south-west. It was between five and six o'clock in the evening, and the wind had changed in our favour. The coast seemed to retire towards the east, and to leave on that side a more open view of the ocean.
Page 184 - Okie. t plains, lakes, and marshes; the turf of which shook under us. The cloudy weather and the rain threw a dreary aspect over these landscapes, the horrid abodes of bears and wolves. Continuing our march for some hours, always ascending, we at length found the snow hard as a rock, but not entirely covering the mountains, as we had expected would have been the case. What is singular, and...

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