A Picturesque Promenade Round Dorking, in Surrey

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Author, and sold by Sir R. Phillips, 1823 - Dorking (England) - 303 pages
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Page 285 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks...
Page 156 - When the ear heard me, then it blessed me; and when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me: Because I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me: and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 60 - In still retreats and flowery solitudes, To Nature's voice attends, from month to month, And day to day, through the revolving year; Admiring, sees her in her every shape ; Feels all her sweet emotions at his heart; Takes what she liberal gives, nor thinks of more.
Page 59 - But by your fathers' worth if yours you rate, Count me those only who were good and great. Go ! if your ancient but ignoble blood Has crept through scoundrels ever since the flood, Go ! and pretend your family is young, Nor own your fathers have been fools so long. What can ennoble sots, or slaves, or cowards ? Alas ! not all the blood of all the Howards.
Page 150 - All is the gift of industry ; whate'er Exalts, embellishes, and renders life Delightful. Pensive Winter, cheer'd by him, Sits at the social fire, and happy hears Th' excluded tempest idly rave along.
Page 54 - Of household smoke, your eye excursive roams : Wide-stretching from the Hall in whose kind haunt The hospitable Genius lingers still, To where the broken landscape, by degrees, Ascending, roughens into rigid hills; O'er which the Cambrian mountains, like far clouds That skirt the blue horizon, dusky rise.
Page 286 - Ah fields belov'd in vain, Where once my careless childhood stray'd, A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales, that from ye blow, A momentary bliss bestow, As waving fresh their gladsome wing, My weary soul they seem to soothe, And redolent of joy and youth, To breathe a second spring.
Page 207 - Or gleam in lengthen'd vista through the trees, You silent steal ; or sit beneath the shade Of solemn oaks, that tuft the swelling mounts Thrown graceful round by Nature's careless hand...
Page 225 - Thy hill, delightful Shene? Here let us sweep The boundless landscape; now the raptured eye, Exulting swift, to huge Augusta send, Now to the sister hills that skirt her plain, To lofty Harrow now, and now to where Majestic Windsor lifts his princely brow.
Page 192 - England for the prodigious prospect to be seen from its summit, though by few observed. From it may be discerned twelve or thirteen counties, with part of the sea on the coast of Sussex, in a serene day. The house is large and ancient, suitable to those hospitable times, and so sweetly environed with those delicious streams and venerable woods, as in the judgment of Strangers as well as Englishmen it may be compared to one of the most pleasant seats in the nation, and most tempting for a great person...

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