A plaine description of the Barmudas, now called Sommer Ilands: With the manner of their discouerie anno 1609. by the shipwrack and admirable deliuerance of Sir Thomas Gates, and Sir George Sommers, wherein are truly set forth the commodities and profits of that rich, pleasant and healthfull countrie. With an addition, or more ample relation of diuers other remarkeable matters concerning those ilands since then experienced, lately sent from thence by one of the colonie now there resident ...

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Printed by W. Stansby, for W. Welby, 1613 - Travel - 51 pages
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Page 10 - ... they were so ouer wearied, and their spirits so spent with long fasting, and continuance of their labour, that for the most part they were fallen asleepe in corners...
Page 19 - I can assure you, for they are very good and wholesome meate, none of it bad, no, not so much as the very guts and maw of it, for they are exceeding fat, and make as good tripes as your beastes bellies in England.
Page 13 - Tortoise itselfe is all very good meate, and yieldeth great store of oyle, which is as sweete as any butter: and one of them will suffice fifty men a meale at least : and of these hath beene taken great store, with two boates at the least forty in one day. . . . We carried with vs also a good portion of Tortoise oyle, which either for frying or baking did vs very great pleasure, it being very sweete nourishing and wholesome.
Page 11 - Newfort, had by their prouident carefulnesse Landed all their men, and so much of the goods and prouisions out of the ship, as was not vtterly spoyled, euerie man disposed and applyed himselfe to search for, and to seeke out such releefe and sustentation, as the Countrie afforded : and Sir George Sommers, a man inured to extremities, (and knowing what thereunto belonged) was in this seruice neither idle nor backward, but presently by his...
Page 12 - Jyeth in little holes in the ground, like vnto a cony-hole, and are in great numbers, exceeding good meate, very fat and sweet (those we had in the winter) and their eggs are white, and of . that bignesse, that they are not to be knowne from Hen egges. The other birds egges are speckled, and of a different colour...
Page 17 - Tortoises great, and of great use. Fowle. dedicated to God in the best manner wee could, wee abode still in the foresaid Hand, with all the rest of our company till Munday morning, being the thirteenth of July : Then we went up with our Ship and company higher...
Page 12 - Pidgeon, and layeth egges as big as Hen egges vpon the sand, where they come and lay them dayly, although men sit downe amongst them ; that there hath beene taken vp in one morning by Sir Thomas Gates...
Page 10 - God to work so strongly as the water was stayed for that little time, (which as we all much feared, was the last period of our breathing) and the ship kept from present sinking, when it pleased God to send her within half an English mile, of that land that Sir George Sommers had not long before descried: which were the Islands of the Barmudas.
Page 10 - ... and happy meeting, in a more blessed world;" when it pleased God out of his most gracious and mercifull...
Page 13 - Palmito tree, which hath a very sweet berry upon which the Hogs doe most feede ; but our men finding the sweetnesse of them, did willingly share with the hogs for them, they being very pleasant and wholesome, which made them carelesse almost of any bread with their meate ; which occasioned...

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