A Plea for a National Museum and Botanic Garden: To be Founded on the Smithsonian Institution, at the City of Washington

Front Cover
publisher not identified, 1841 - Museums - 12 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - Sí que no siempre se está en los templos; no siempre se ocupan los oratorios; no siempre se asiste a los negocios, por calificados que sean. Horas hay de recreación, donde el afligido espíritu descanse. Para este efecto se plantan las alamedas, se buscan las fuentes, se allanan las cuestas y se cultivan con curiosidad los jardines.
Page 5 - ... of the organic law may dispute the competency of the legislature to provide. It is well known that we have a class of statesmen, so called, whose minds are of so subtle and disputatious a cast, that no public measure, however valuable and desirable, can receive their support, unless it be expressly provided for in the Constitution, and even then they are always ready and prone to raise objections to any details of a liberal tendency. They have been so thoroughly disciplined in the school of "strict...
Page 12 - ... would promptly respond to so reasonable a request ? To doubt their compliance with such a manifestation of the sovereign will would be treason against the very theory of our Government. I shall be guilty of no such political heresy. I shall anticipate no such contumacious neglect of representative duty; but will look forward with confidence to the day, when the citizens of this Republic shall possess all the means, and enjoy all the advantages, of intellectual culture which have been hitherto...
Page 5 - ... from every Government that aspires to an equal rank with the rest of the civilized world. But, as the immediate and palpable benefits of an observatory inure mainly to the commercial and military marine, it seems to come especially within the province, and to be the duty, of Congress, to provide such an establishment at the proper cost of the country. It appears to me to come distinctly under the same constitutional provision, for the protection and regulation of commerce, which authorizes the...
Page 11 - The very atmosphere of the place would be uusuited to his respiration, and every influence within its boundaries would combine to expel him from the consecrated ground. Or, if by some miraculous development, a taste for liberal pursuits should chance to be awakened in such an incumbent, we should see a metamorphosis as salutary as it would be rare, and thus the institution •would still be safe. In every event, I believe it would prove a most valuable auxiliary in diffusing useful knowledge —...
Page 6 - ... easiest possible terms, of the skill and experience which have been slowly and painfully acquired by others. In pursuance of this object I would appropriate, in perpetuity, the income of the Smithsonian bequest to the establishment and maintenance of an institution at the city of "Washington, the duty and business of which should be to procure from every region of the globe, as opportunity offered, perfect specimens of every production...
Page 3 - This donation, amounting to about half a million of dollars, has been •duly received, and is now in the possession ot the United States, awaiting the action of the Government to carry into •effect the magnanimous design of the testator; and as every citizen of this Republic is interested in the appropriate use, and faithful management, of the...
Page 5 - They have been so thoroughly disciplined in the school of "strict construction," and are so "profoundly skilled in analytic," that, like Sir Hudibras, they can " distinguish and divide " A hair 'twixt south and southwest side " — and no direct proposition can be started, for the generous purpose of improving our moral and intellectual character, as a people, which does not encounter the most inveterate cavilling. Hence it is, that I am for embracing the golden...
Page 5 - ... and which is due, as a contribution to Science, from every Government that aspires to an equal rank with the rest of the civilized world. But, as the immediate and palpable benefits of an observatory inure mainly to the commercial and military marine, it seems to come especially within the province, and to be the duty, of Congress, to provide such an establishment at the proper cost of the country. It appears to me to come distinctly under the same constitutional provision, for the protection...
Page 11 - ... object of generous rivalry with successive administrations, each striving in turn to excel its predecessors in promoting the prosperity and extending the benefits of the establishment I cannot permit myself to believe there would be any danger of its ever degenerating into an object of mere partisan cupidity, or being converted into a political lair by any of that ravenous tribe who instinctively lie in wait for the offal of Government patronage. Such a desecration would shock the national sense...

Bibliographic information