A Plea for Better Schools

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Shurick & Hansen Company, 1916 - Rural schools - 47 pages
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Page 11 - There should be no internal communication between the residence and the school. Windows should be carried up as near to the ceiling as practical. There should be a separate and distinct yard with office. "Apart from these simple rules, the architect is advised to make a thoroughly comfortable house. Every room must be Fig.
Page 41 - ... apparatus, the required temperature of the room will be quickly restored. I would say, in conclusion, that the buildings shown in both designs can be easily doubled in capacity by placing a floor above the one now shown. As I said before, I have not tried in either design to produce a cheap building, but have endeavored, by the use of the best materials, combined with sound construction and a careful consideration of the requirements of the occupants, to show that structures can be built having...
Page 27 - ... nuisance permitted within 100 feet of any schoolhouse or of any fence inclosing the yard of a schoolhouse; the Vermont Board of Health protects schoolhouses, if in a village, from noises and unsavory odors. The Minnesota Department of Education directs that no part of a school site shall be within 500 feet of steam railroads or manufacturing plants which may be sources of noise or smoke, swampy places, livery stables or other buildings which may be sources of unhealthful conditions. The New Hampshire...
Page 11 - The parlor must not open directly into the kitchen or scullery. (d.) There must be no internal communication between the residence and the school.
Page 26 - BRIGGS, ARCHITECT, BRIDGEPORT, CONN. Under the stimulating influences of what is known as Sanitary Reform, the outgrowth mainly of the systematic organization of state and local boards of health, there is in some localities a laudable desire among the school and building committees to improve the general condition of existing school-houses, and in those about to be erected to embody, in a greater or less degree, the lessons taught by sanitary science and practical experience. While the spirit of...
Page 14 - Ample coal is usually supplied to the teacher for heating and cooking. Light is another item which is granted free, although in some districts a limit of expense is set by the school boards. Such renovations as may be required from time to time, are made at public expense. "The teachers...
Page 26 - School buildings, unless the gift of some individual who desires to perpetuate his name, are not monumental, in character, and as they are erected by the taxation of the people for the use of their children, it is obvious that no more money should be expended upon them than is necessary to secure a perfect building inside, and a. pleasing one outside.
Page 39 - ... sanitary arrangements are neglected, the structure, so far as its healthful usefulness is concerned, will be a failure. I am aware that it is an uncommon occurrence to find waterclosets in any school building outside of a city. Privies situated in the yard are considered sufficient. They are usually poorly built, and are only accessible by exposure to the weather, and are anything but elevating to the morals of the children. In some instances, you will find privy-vaults under the same roof that...
Page 41 - ... the best materials, combined with sound construction and a careful consideration of the requirements of the occupants, to show that structures can be built having all the comforts of ordinary ones, without their objectionable features. While many of the theories I advance may be new, and consequently not looked upon with favor, it will still be acknowledged that an honesty of purpose in my plea for better buildings for the young has alone actuated me. If the perusal of these pages will in any...
Page 14 - The teachers' cottage has become an important feature in the administration of rural schools because the people take a decided interest in it. They feel that the teacher's presence has a marked influence upon the community and that this influence is broadened and strengthened when the teacher lives in a model dwelling and works under the most wholesome conditions.

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