A Plea for Industrial Education in the Public Schools: Addressed to the Conference of Associated Charities of the City of Boston, February 10, 1887

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Cupples, Upham & Company, 1887 - Technical education - 34 pages
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Page 33 - I consider that the results go far to prove that manual training is so great a relief to the iteration of school work that it is a positive benefit rather than a detriment to the course in the other studies.
Page 21 - Manual training is essential to the right and full development of the human mind, and therefore no less beneficial to those who are not going to become artisans than to those who are. The workshop method of instruction is of great educational value, for it brings the learner face to face with the facts of nature ; his mind increases in knowledge by direct personal experience with forms of matter and manifestations of force. No mere words intervene. The manual exercises of the shop train mental power,...
Page 4 - ... and it shall be the duty of the secretary of the State board of education to furnish to the teachers or persons having charge of any school, on their request, such registers and blanks for returns as may be necessary for compliance with the provisions of this section.
Page 33 - The walls in the school room were found to be so thick as to deaden the sound almost completely. It was thought, also, that taking a part of a class away from its regular school work would result in more or less detriment to its progress in the prescribed studies. Here and there a complaint was made by the teacher of some second class boy that he was not doing his work well in his own room ; but the pupil, in every case, was so anxious to remain iu the " carpenters' class" that a word or two of warning...
Page 25 - As time passed, a more marked separation between mental and manual education began to take place. The schools gradually improved. Better methods of teaching and a larger number of subjects were introduced, and a higher standard set, all demanding more time from the pupil. But quite as marked a change was going on in the industries. Increased demand led to competition, to the invention of special tools to cheapen production, to a greater subdivision of labor, and to the concentration of the individual...
Page 24 - ... having any industries to foster or extend. In our own country the more extended and varied use of machinery has caused the more rapid decay of the system, and if we .except, perhaps, England, no country stands to-day in such urgent need of a remedy or substitute. In the early days in our own country, when our system of public education was still in its infancy, mental and manual education were much more intimately connected than at the present day. The industries of the country were still in...
Page 30 - ... handicraft, bringing the industrial ends of the earth together, just as the higher and finer arts express the feelings and sentiments of our common humanity, it has at the same time justified itself in all countries as a most valuable auxiliary to purely scholastic studies for developing the intellect, and widening and deepening the capacity and power of the individual. Nor would it be possible to estimate the value to the industries of the world, of this general cultivation of the intellect...
Page 25 - By his attendance, for three or four months of each year during his apprenticeship, upon the district school, the mental culture of the apprentice was not entirely discontinued; and thus, by alternating between the school and the shop, his mental and manual education were never entirely divorced, but each in an important sense aided the other. During this formative period of the student's life, one set of habits was not formed to the exclusion of others, which in the end might prove more important....
Page 24 - ... education were much more intimately connected than at the present day. The industries of the country were still in a crude state ; agriculture and a few only of the more necessary mechanic trades having any existence. These trades demanded but little artistic taste, and not the highest manual skill. The master became responsible, in an important sense, for the mental and moral well-being of the apprentice, besides teaching him the manual of his trade, with such knowledge of the theory and such...
Page 16 - So vast appear to me the advantages, social and physiological, to be derived from this source, that, were these exercises in no sense and in no degree educational, I would still lay this duty on the schools, as a burden to be carried for the general good, and would employ the authority of the Commonwealth to train every girl within our borders in these all-essential domestic arts. If, as Horace Mann said, it is a crime for a boy here to grow up in ignorance of reading and writing, what sort of an...

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