A Practical Grammar: In which Words, Phrases, and Sentences are Classified According to Their Offices, and Their Various Relations to One Another : Illustrated by a Complete System of Diagrams

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1866 - English language - 309 pages
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Page 276 - And the widows of Ashur are loud in their wail, And the idols are broke in the temple of Baal, And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword, Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord ! Lord Byron.
Page 277 - And yet, fair bow, no fabling dreams, But words of the Most High, Have told why first thy robe of beams Was woven in the sky.
Page 161 - To him who in the love of nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty ; and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy that steals away Their sharpness ere he is aware.
Page 63 - The hoary head is a crown of glory, if it be found in the way of righteousness.
Page 76 - Like the leaves of the forest when Summer is green, That host with their banners at sunset were seen: Like the leaves of the forest when Autumn hath blown, That host on the morrow lay withered and strown. For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast, And breathed in the face of the foe as he passed...
Page 236 - Tis as the general pulse Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause ; An awful pause! prophetic of her end.
Page 282 - There is a calm for those who weep, A rest for weary pilgrims found: And while the mouldering ashes sleep Low in the ground...
Page 229 - Ahasuerus' name, and sealed it with the king's ring, and sent letters by posts on horseback, and riders on mules, camels, and young dromedaries: " wherein the king granted the Jews which were in every city to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life, to destroy, to slay, and to cause to perish, all the power of the people and province that would assault them, both little ones and women, and to take the spoil of them for a prey...
Page 44 - THE OLD OAKEN BUCKET. How dear to this heart are the scenes of my childhood, When fond recollection presents them to view!
Page 14 - For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn Or busy housewife ply her evening care: No children run to lisp their sire's return, Or climb his knees the envied kiss to share.

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