A Practical Grammar of the Dutch Language ...

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Arbon & Krap, 1819 - 396 pages
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Page 388 - There are few great personages in history who have been more exposed to the calumny of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than queen Elizabeth ; and yet there is scarcely any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome all prejudices ; and obliging her detractors...
Page 390 - ... undue ascendant over her. In her family, in her court, in her kingdom, she remained equally mistress. The force of the tender passions was great over her, but the force of her mind was still superior...
Page 371 - Such men, like timorous deer that escaped out of the hunter's toils, will ever be upon the alarm and ready to fly.' The Senate, greatly affected with his disinterestedness, magnanimity, and contempt of life, would willingly have preserved him, and continued the war in Africa. Some were of...
Page 390 - ... due to her, they make great addition to it. They owed all of them their advancement to her choice...
Page 390 - Few sovereigns of England succeeded to the throne in more difficult circumstances; and none ever conducted the government with such uniform success and felicity. Though unacquainted with the practice of toleration, the true secret for managing religious factions, she preserved her people, by her superior prudence, from those confusions in which theological controversy had involved all the neighbouring nations...
Page 389 - HER singular talents for government were founded equally on her temper and on her capacity. Endowed with a great command over herself, she soon obtained an uncontrolled ascendant over her people...
Page 361 - quoth the abbot, " and here, in a cup of sack, I remember the health of his Grace your master. I would give a hundred pounds on the condition I could feed so heartily on beef as you do.
Page 342 - WE all of us complain of the shortness of time, saith Seneca, and yet have much more than we know what to do with. Our lives, says he, are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. We are always complaining our days are few, and acting as though there would be no end of them.
Page 134 - The Second Future intimates that the action will be fully accomplished, at or before the time of another future action or event : as, " I shall have dined at one o'clock ;" " The two houses will have finished their business, when the king comes to prorogue them.
Page 388 - ... of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than Queen Elizabeth; and yet there scarce is any, whose reputation has been more certainly determined, by the unanimous consent of posterity.

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