A practical guide for the light infantry officer

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Page 14 - Present. On the word present, both ranks bring their firelocks to the present, each man slowly and independently levelling at the particular object which his eye has fixed upon ; and as soon as he has covered his object, each man fires of his own accord, without waiting for any word of command. The elbows must on no account be projected.
Page 21 - But against infantry, it cannot be too heavy or quick, and should be continued till the enemy is beaten or repulsed. 2. Defensive fire belongs principally to infantry, when posted on heights, which are to be defended by musketry. As soldiers generally present too high, and as fire is the greatest consequence...
Page 61 - The faces of the men, not their breasts or feet, are the line of dressing. Each man is to be able just to distinguish the lower part of the face of the . second man beyond him.
Page 5 - File-leaders must be particularly careful to preserve their proper distances from which ever hand they are to dress to, and the followers of each file must only be attentive to cover, and be regulated by their proper fileleaders. FILES, CLOSE, in cavalry, are at the distance when each man's boot-top touches, but does not press, that of his neighbour. FILES...
Page 4 - After facing, and at the word March, the whole squad steps off at the same instant, each replacing, or rather overstepping, the foot of the man before him ; that is, the right foot of the second man comes within the left foot of the first, and thus of every one, more or less overlapping, according to the closeness or openness t,f the files, and the length of step.
Page 4 - March, the whole squad steps off at the same instant, each replacing, or rather overstepping, the foot of the man before him ; that is, the right foot of the second man comes within the left foot of the first, and thus of every one, more or less overlapping, according to the closeness or openness of the files, and the length of step. The front rank will march straight along the given line : each soldier of that rank must look along the necks of those before him, and never to right or left, otherwise...
Page 32 - It follows that, to make the ball arrive at the mark * intended, the sight must not be always precisely levelled at that mark. Suppose a mark, six feet high, divided into three equal parts, if the distance from...
Page 61 - Dressing is to be taught equally by the left as by the right. On the word Dress, each individual will cast his eyes to the point to which he is ordered to dress, with the smallest turn possible of the head, but preserving the shoulders and body square to their front. The whole person of the man must move as may be necessary, and bending backward or forward is not to be permitted. He must take short quick steps, thereby gradually and exactly to gain his position, and on no account be suffered to attempt...
Page 88 - ... who prefers this position to throw a body of infantry in an open country to resist cavalry, or even a superior force of infantry ; because it is regular, and equally strong, and gives an enemy no reason to expect better success by attacking one place than another.
Page xxiii - Others are subject to infirmities, amongst " which those of the sight must be particu" larly noticed ; and even among them, some " who see well in the day-time are almost " blind at night. Some old soldiers have the " genius of resources, and having observed " some situation or passage, may be able to " give a good advice, which ought to be turned " to advantage.

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