A practical illustration of "Woman's right to labor": or, A letter from Marie E. Zakrzewska ...

Front Cover
Walker, Wise and Company, 1860 - German Americans - 167 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 145 - If you were a young man, I could not find words in which to express my satisfaction and pride in respect to your acts ; for I know that all you accomplish you owe to yourself: but you are a woman, a weak woman ; and all that I can do for you now is to grieve and to weep. O my daughter ! return from this unhappy path.
Page 45 - ... to learn. I saw nobleness in dens and meanness in palaces, virtue among prostitutes and vice among so-called respectable women. I learned to judge human nature correctly, to see goodness where the world found nothing but faults, and also to see faults where the world could see nothing but virtues. The experience thus gained cost me the bloom of youth, yet I would not exchange it for a life of everlasting juvenescence.
Page 45 - I learned all of life that it was possible for a human being to learn. I saw nobleness in dens and meanness in palaces, virtue among prostitutes and vice among so-called respectable women.
Page 18 - She also tried to diffuse any accusations of conceit on her part by emphasizing both her own humility and the usefulness of her story. Thus, as she explained at the beginning of her letter: "I am not a great personage ...; yet you may find, in reading this little sketch, that with few talents, and very moderate means for developing them, I have accomplished more than many women of genius and education would have done in my place, for the reason that confidence and faith in their own powers were wanting.
Page 131 - I never in my life was so little myself. Yet she did take this interest; for she gave me a sketch of her own experience in acquiring a medical education, and explained the requirements for such in this country, and the obstacles that are thrown in the way of women who seek to become physicians. She told me of her plan of founding a hospital, — the long-cherished idea of my life; and said that she had opened a little dispensary — the charter for which was procured during the preceding winter,...
Page 45 - During these years, I learned all of life that it was possible for a human being to learn. I saw nobleness in dens and meanness in palaces ... I learned to judge human nature correctly, to see goodness where the world found nothing but faults . . . The experience thus gained cost me the bloom of youth, yet I would not exchange it for a life of everlasting...
Page 3 - An apprenticeship of six years ! " exclaimed the young lady of a chemical turn. " I should like to learn very much, so that I could be a chemist, if I ever had to ; but poison myself for six years over those 'fumes,' not I." It is easy to rail against society and men in general : but it is very painful for a woman to confess her heaviest obstacle to success ; namely, the weakness of women. The slave who dances, unconscious of degradation, on the auction-block, is at once the greatest stimulus and...

Bibliographic information