A Practical Introduction to Composition: Harmony Simplified

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O. Ditson, 1901 - Composition (Music) - 135 pages
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Page 75 - He died that we might be forgiven, he died to make us good, that we might go at last to heaven, saved by his precious blood.
Page 136 - The most important thing is to cultivate the sense of hearing. Take pains early to distinguish tones and keys by the ear. The bell* the window-pane, the cuckoo — seek to find what tones they each give out.— ROBERT SCHUMANN.
Page 136 - ... instantly recognized when played. The author of this little book, feeling that children can't begin too early to have their ears properly trained, has compiled a simple and yet thorough set of exercises and examples in rudimentary harmony. Far too much attention has hitherto been given to the mere playing of music, whereas a simple study of harmony and the cultivation of the ear should always go hand in hand with the training of the fingers. A faithful use of this book with even very young children...
Page 57 - ... lower results than the formula between 250° and 360° C. It is very likely that the values of p given by the formula may be too high in this region, but the difference shown does not greatly, if at all, exceed the probable errors of experiment. CHAPTER VIII THE CRITICAL STATE 74. Properties of CO2. It would be beyond the scope of the present work to attempt a review of all the Various speculations current with regard to the critical state, or to construct a system of equations capable of representing...
Page 19 - When any tone other than the root is in the bass, the chord is said to be inverted or in a new position.
Page 136 - T is often noticeable how deficient musicians are in knowledge of their art, and how untrained their ears are in the power to follow intelligently harmonic progressions. Even an accurate knowledge of the more common intervals, such as major and minor thirds, augmented fifths, diminished sevenths, etc., is by no means common. Nothing is more valuable to the musician, be he composer, teacher or executant, than some degree of "inner hearing...
Page 19 - It is generally best to double th» root, which for the present will always be in the bass; when a note other than the root is in the bass, the chord is said to be inverted...
Page 136 - ... so that if one is asked to sing a minor third or a major seventh, it can be easily done ; or so that the same ir tervals may be instantly recognized when played. The author of this little book, feeling that children can't begin too early to have their ears properly trained, has compiled a simple and yet thorough set of exercises and examples in rudimentary harmony.
Page 3 - When the three upper voices, soprano, alto, and tenor, are within an octave, the harmony is said to be close, or the chords are said to be in close position.
Page 13 - Tenth or Third. Eleventh or Fourth. Twelfth or Fifth. Thirteenth or Sixth.

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