A Practical Medico-historical Account of the Western Coast of Africa: Embracing a Topographical Description of Its Shores, Rivers, and Settlements, with Their Seasons and Comparative Healthiness, Together with the Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment, of the Fevers of Western Africa, and a Similar Account Respecting the Other Diseases which Prevail There

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Highley, 1831 - 423 pages
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Page 23 - As the ship draws in with the shore signs of civilization appear and increase with rapidity, both in number and attractiveness. Freetown and the lately-formed villages in its neighbourhood at first shew like anomalous patches in the view, but, on a nearer approach, they add greatly to its beauty and its interest. When the ship has arrived just at that point of distance from which a person may see all the broad outlines and apparent characteristics of an extensive scene, without beine able to discern...
Page 76 - Many instances have been known of men, whilst at work under the rays of the sun, dropping down, as if shot ; and that, without any previous threatening symptom or habit of indiscretion ; and also men, who, to avoid the closeness sometimes experienced in sleeping between decks, have slept on the upper deck, without the knowledge of the officer on watch, thus, exposing themselves to the apparently harmless beams of a brilliant moon, have often been known to be suddenly affected with fever. The rapidity...
Page 40 - ... heavenly expanse, which increases and descends towards the horizon, with a gradual and slow, but visible motion. In its descent, it becomes circumscribed by a dark ring, which extends itself on every side, and as soon as the silvery cloud approaches the horizon, veils it in impenetrable gloom. At the moment, the elements seem to have ceased their operations, and the very functions of nature to be paralyzed ; the atmosphere appears to be deprived of the spirit of vitality, and a sensation of approaching...
Page 41 - ... or sinking them under weigh or at anchor ; and to that succeeds a furious deluge of rain, which falls in one vast sheet, rather than in drops, and concludes this terrible convulsion.
Page 40 - This terrific combination of the elements sweeps along the whole of the coast under consideration ; but it occurs with peculiar violence on what is called the windward coast, especially at Sierra Leone. Its denomination is derived from the Portuguese, it being a corruption of the word trueno, which means thunder-storm. Its approach is first discernible by the appearance of a small, clear, silvery speck, at a high altitude in the heavenly expanse, which increases and descends towards the horizon,...
Page 40 - ... and violence, till the shocks become appalling ; when the thunder is at its loudest, a tremendous gust of wind rushes with incredible and often irresistible vehemence from the darkened part of the horizon, not rarely in its course carrying away roofs of houses and...
Page 40 - It consists of successive flashes of the most vivid lightning, tremendous shocks of thunder, rapidly and alarmingly reiterated, impetuous gusts of wind, deluging rain. This terrific combination of the elements sweeps along the whole of the coast under consideration ; but it occurs with peculiar violence on what is called the windward coast, especially at Sierra Leone. Its denomination is derived from the Portuguese, it being a corruption of the word trueno, which means thunder-storm. Its approach...
Page 41 - ... them under weigh or at anchor ; and to that succeeds a furious deluge of rain, which falls in one vast sheet, rather than in drops, and concludes this terrible convulsion. The lightning is of the most vivid description, and, contrary to what has b::en reported of it, seldom sheet lightning, but forked and piercing, and often extremely destructive, both to things animate and inanimate. Its apparently doubtful, wild course, is sometimes directed to a large and lofty tree, and the foliage, at the...
Page 42 - ... after its commencement, which sweep through the streets of Freetown with astonishing velocity, bearing with them all the exposed vegetable and other matter in a state of putridity or decay. ' Such is the tornado ; and it is by the preponderating power of its gusts, and the atmospheric influence of lightning and its rain, that noxious exhalations from the earth, and deleterious miasmata, before confined to the neighbourhood of their origin by opposed or light currents of air, in the day, or attracted...
Page 280 - Eighteen days after her arrival, viz., on the 11th of May, a boy (son of one of the Serjeants of the garrison) was violently attacked and died, but it is neither known nor believed that he had any nearer communication with the sick of the Bann than passing daily at no great distance from the tents to feed his father's poultry." About this time the fever in the Bann had nearly ceased, but it went on daily attacking some of the garrison; and it appears by the official report that twenty-eight were...

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