A Practical Treatise on Labor

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G. W. Carleton & Company, 1871 - Labor - 405 pages
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Page 32 - Governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them; and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them they are ruined too. Wherefore, governments rather depend upon men than men upon governments. Let men be good and the government cannot be bad; if it be ill, they will cure it. But if men be bad, let the government be never so good they will endeavor to warp and spoil it to their turn.
Page 223 - The real price of every thing, what every thing really costs to the man who wants to acquire it, is the toil and trouble of acquiring it.
Page 75 - That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety and happiness.
Page 379 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, Each in his narrow cell forever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 222 - THE annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.
Page 311 - An act to provide a national currency secured by a pledge of United States bonds, and to provide for the circulation and redemption thereof,
Page 31 - Any government is free to the people under it, whatever be the frame, where the laws rule and the people are a party to these laws. And more than this is tyranny, oligarchy, or confusion.
Page 75 - For the advancement of these ends they have at all times an inalienable and indefeasible right to alter, reform or abolish their government in such manner as they may think proper.
Page 327 - That any person who is the head of a family, or who has arrived at the age of twenty-one years, and is a citizen of the United States, or who shall have filed his declaration of intention to become such...
Page 240 - Labour was the first price, the original purchasemoney that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all the wealth of the world was originally purchased; and its value to those who possess it and who want to exchange it for some new productions is precisely equal to the quantity of labour which it can enable them to purchase or command.

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