A Practical Treatise on Midwifery: Containing the Results of Sixteen Thousand, Six Hundred and Fifty-four Births, Occurring in the Dublin Lying-in Hospital, During a Period of Seven Years, Commencing November, 1826

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W.D. Ticknor, 1841 - Midwifery - 320 pages
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Page 18 - Let it be carefully recollected at the same time, that so long as the head advances EVER so SLOWLY, the patient's pulse continues good, the abdomen free from pain on pressure, and no obstruction to the removal of urine, interference should not be attempted, unless the child be dead.
Page 237 - I am satisfied, however, that, in hospital, the immediate application of three or four dozen leeches, followed by the warm bath, in which the patient should remain as long as her strength will bear it, will be found in the great majority the most judicious means of removing blood."* After full depletion, the next most powerful remedy is mercury, alone or in combination with opium.
Page 18 - of no case where the advantage derived from the use of the stethoscope is more fully demonstrated than in the information it enables us to arrive at with regard to the life or death of the foetus, in the progress of tedious and difficult labours. It is, in my opinion, one of the greatest improvements made in the practice of midwifery."1 The whole evidence of Dr. Collins...
Page 17 - This, however, is an operation that no inducement should tempt any individual to perform, except the imperative duty of saving the life of the mother when placed in imminent danger. I have no difficulty in stating...
Page 231 - In 1828, the attack of puerperal fever was much more severe, proving fatal to twenty-one women. It continued to increase in violence considerably in the months of January, February, and the early part of March, 1829, after which it disappeared, and for the four remaining years of my mastership we did not lose a single patient from this disease.
Page 64 - About an hour and a half after, suddenly, the most profuse haemorrhage set in, so much so, that in two or three minutes, the blood was running in every direction over the edge of the bed ; this was consequent on some slight uterine action. There being no chance of life without speedy delivery, we determined to make the attempt, though the parts were badly prepared ; accordingly, the hand was very slowly and cautiously introduced, and the feet brought down with little exertion ; the uterus acted strongly,...
Page 130 - Herrirnau, 37 recovered ; and of 30 reported by Dr. Collins, only 5 died. Of the latter, three of the fatal cases were complicated with laceration of the vagina, one with twins and one with peritonitis. Braun is of the opinion that 30 per-cent. have proved fatal to the mother. These tables display varied results and are defective for the reason that no distinction is made between the several forms and complications of the convulsions incident to parturition. The relative mortality which...
Page 188 - ... is less than is believed to prevail in this country. This proportion perhaps would have been increased, had the returns been complete. One physician in this country has attended 1600 cases, of which 1 in 90 was a plurality case. Dr. Collins in his Practical Treatise on Midwifery, p. 186, says, that in France the proportion is one in every 95 births ; in Germany, one in 80; in England, one in 92 ; in Scotland, one in 95 ; but in Ireland, the proportion is one in every 62. Of 129,172 women delivered...
Page 188 - ... Prussia. To 3,525 inhabitants 100 births are annually registered in France, 113 in England, 133 in Prussia, 136 in Austria, 151 in Russia. The small number of births in France is not accounted for by any difference in the proportion of the persons married, who are, in fact, more numerous in France than in any other country from which I have been able to procure returns. It appears that 100 French wives had 14 children, 100 Prussian wives 21 children yearly ; or, in other terms, 717 wives bore...
Page 236 - Puerperal fever, when epidemic in hospital, is directly the reverse; at least, in four epidemics which I have witnessed, the symptoms were usually of the lowest typhoid description, the pulse being so feeble and indistinct as to make you dread in many even the application of leeches...

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