A Practical Treatise on the Manufacture of Brick, Tiles and Terra-cotta ...

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H.C. Baird & Company, 1895 - Bricks - 628 pages
 

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Contents

Varieties of Mount Savage fire clay and their properties
49
Nonimportance of organic matter in clay Composition of clay which
55
Screens in general use Advantage of a circular revolving screen Dig
61
Various modes of raising water Extraction of clay by underground
65
Value of these analyses Necessity of supplementing the analyses
77
Explanation of the term going through the sweat
83
Commencement of the brickmaking season in the Middle States Tem
88
Improved forms of drying sheds Slop method of moulding brick
94
Quantity of air to be admitted into the kiln during burning Settling
100
Sizing the clay Duties of the temperer for the pugmill Motive
107
CHAPTER IV
115
Gear and friction winding drum of the FreySheckler Co described
121
Hot water tempering Simple method for thawing clay
127
Pugmills Pugmill built by the FreySheckler Co described
133
Double geared pugmill made by the FreySheckler Co
135
Mascot machine with daisy cutting table described and illustrated
141
Special Bucyrus giant machine described and illustrated
147
Improved brickdrying shed with detailed description and illustrations
153
Steam dryfloors Mode of construction by Mr A Crossly of Ironton
161
Brief history of various dryers Bucyrus steam tunnel dryer described
168
Wheelbarrows with descriptions and illustrations
175
Burning brick
178
Explanation of watersmoke
184
Experiments of burning with gas by Mr J R Boice of Toledo Ohio
190
Results of burning brick with oil obtained by Mr D V Purington
197
Peculiar form of the former
203
Factors on which the successful manufacture of vitrified brick for road
209
Drypan made by the FreySheckler Co described and illustrated
215
Provisions of the Chicago Roadway Paving Ordinance Drying paving
221
Annealing pavingbrick
228
The term dryclay to a certain extent a misnomer Introduction of dry
235
Dryclay pulverizers described
241
Water of shrinking and water of porosity
247
Gluts for pressed brick Directions by Geo Carnell of Philadelphia
254
Loss by weathering Moulding the gluts
260
Reburning of brick
266
Arrangement of the drying shed Repressing the gluts Setting as done
272
Manufacture of ornamental brick and tiles by the stiff mud process
279
Up and down draft kilns Invention of Mr Willis N Graves
287
Sizes of the English and German brick Comparison of the quantity
294
Permanent kiln roofs Kiln roof invented by Mr Thomas F Adams
303
Causes to which the irregular wearing in furnace roofs may be due
308
MKenzie cupola shapes illustrated Cupola blocks illustrated
315
Cause of the rapid wear of the brick work of the stacks of blastfurnaces
321
Bursting of firebrick from the formation of carbon deposits on particles
327
Explanation of the bursting of firebrick Cause of the formation of
328
Drying and tempering Temperature at which drying is commenced
380
Silica firebrick Discovery of the use of Dinas
386
Firms in the United States engaged in the manufacture of silica brick
392
Making and drying the pots Mode of shipping the pots
397
Lack of specific knowledge regarding the details of the art in America
403
A good and welltested system in present use Importance of the floor
409
Pressing the brick and presses used for the purpose
411
Mixing the slips and bodies with clean cold water Weight of 1 pint
417
Caution to be exercised when opening holes in the top of the arch
423
Philosophy of the formation of the glaze What the glaze produced upon
428
Trimming and drying the pipes Manner of making branches and traps
434
Machine for cutting sewerpipe rings described and illustrated
440
CHAPTER XIII
446
Selection of clay for drain tile Mr John G Wagner of Covington Ky
447
Manufacture of tiles in other Western States and in the South Advant
453
Proper management of opentop kilns
459
Dodd Carrier for horizontal tile machines described and illustrated
465
Examination of a piece of terracotta in cold weather under a magni
469
Recent material prosperity of this country evidenced by its street archi
478
Location of the kilns in the factory with illustration
484
Method of finding the proportion of grit suited to the crude clay
487
Kinds of clay the terracotta maker must have Difference in the value
493
Philosophy of the drying of a panel of claywork
499
Essential qualifications in a good kiln Fuels for terracotta
505
CHAPTER XV
511
Demand for tiles in the United States Definition of a tile Families
512
Tiles of the Jews and Phoenicians Employment of tiles by the Greeks
518
Mode of stamping Die cutting Modeling
524
Great attention paid in France to the manufacture of glazed and enam
528
Manner of obtaining textures low reliefs or intaglios of natural objects
534
CHAPTER XVI
542
Process of manufacturing roofingtiles Preparation of the clay Knead
548
Variety of articles produced in large tile works the clay used
552
Demonstration of the real value of tileroofs Story of the establishment
558
Tileroof the coming roof in the United States Comparison of the price
564
Term for brick in hieroglyphs and its meaning Brickmaking probably
570
Glazes for Dutch tiles White glaze Deep red glaze Dark red glaze
576
Machine for moulding roofing tile from plastic clay with detailed
585
Causes to which the perfection of ancient brickmaking may have been
590
Invention of Mr Robert Eltzner of New York City for the manufact
592
Index
599
Burning brick in kilns probably of Roman origin Opus reticulatum
602
Improbability of brickmaking in England in the reign of Alfred
615
Chambers machine fitted with the automatic wire cutoff described
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