A Primer of the Peace Movement

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American Peace Society, 1915 - Peace - 22 pages
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Page 9 - Although the new Imperialism has been bad business for the nation, it has been good business for certain classes and certain trades within the nation. The vast expenditure on armaments, the costly wars, the grave risks and embarrassments of foreign policy, the checks upon political and social reforms within great Britain, though fraught with great injury to the nation, have served well the present business interests of certain industries and professions.
Page 20 - My first wish is to see this plague to mankind banished from the earth, and the sons and daughters of this world employed in more pleasing and innocent amusements, than in preparing implements and exercising them for the destruction of mankind.
Page 20 - Take my word for it, if you had seen but one day of war you would pray to Almighty God that you might never see such a thing again.
Page 13 - If the press of the world would adopt and persist in the high resolve that war should be no more, the clangor of arms would cease. — JOHN HAY.
Page 20 - It has been my misfortune to be engaged in more battles than any other general on the other side of the Atlantic ; but there was never a time during my command when I would not have gladly chosen some settlement by reason rather than by the sword.
Page 20 - The more I study the world, the more am I convinced of the inability of brute force to create anything durable.
Page 9 - Progress." — John Morley. Investors. Foreign investments are enormously increasing in weak and poorly governed countries. Poor Asiatics are supposed to be better customers than our own negroes and poor whites and South Americans. Put this year's naval budget into Southern schools, create new wants and resources, and we should have immensely larger sales near home.
Page 20 - Though educated a soldier, and though I have gone through two wars, I have always been a man of peace, preferring to see questions of difference settled by arbitration.
Page 9 - England— you push on into territories where you have no business to be and where you had promised not to go; secondly, your intrusion provokes resentment, and, in these wild countries, resentment means resistance; thirdly, you instantly cry out that the people are rebellious and that their act is rebellion (this in spite of your own assurance that you have no intention of setting up a permanent sovereignty...
Page 9 - ... resentment means resistance; thirdly, you instantly cry out that the people are rebellious and that their act is rebellion (this in spite of your own assurance that you have no intention of setting up a permanent sovereignty over them) ; fourthly, you send a force to stamp out the rebellion; and fifthly, having spread bloodshed, confusion and anarchy, you declare, with...

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