A Reminiscence of the Free-soil Movement in New Hampshire, 1845

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J. Wilson and son, 1885 - New Hampshire - 44 pages
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Page 26 - I never can abandon. It has assigned to the President the power of making treaties with the advice and consent of the Senate. It was doubtless supposed that these two branches of government would combine, without passion and with the best means of information, those facts and principles upon which the success of our foreign relations will always depend; that they ought not to substitute for their own...
Page 24 - Truth, crushed to earth, shall rise again; The eternal years of God are hers; But Error, wounded, writhes in pain, And dies among his worshippers.
Page 3 - GOD bless New Hampshire ! — from her granite peaks Once more the voice of Stark and Langdon speaks. The long bound vassal of the exulting South For very shame her self-forged chain has broken — Torn the black seal of slavery from her mouth, And in the clear tones of her old time spoken!
Page 38 - On the other hand, we insisted upon organizing as Democrats. We refused to leave the Democratic party, on account of our declaration of sentiments ; we claimed that AntiSlavery was true Democracy. We refused to leave the party, and we have refused to leave to this day, until we have got a majority of the Democracy of New Hampshire on the Republican side. [Applause.] Well, gentlemen, I wish you to correct the history you are making. You have no right, permit me to say, to write on the page of history...
Page 26 - Whatever, then, concerns our foreign relations ; whatever requires the consent of another nation, belongs to the treaty power; can only be regulated by it; and it is competent to regulate all such subjects; provided, and here are its true limits, such regulations are not inconsistent with the Constitution.
Page 40 - When our forefathers bade a last farewell to the homes of their childhood, the graves of their fathers, and the temples of their God, and ventured upon all the desperate contingencies of wintry seas and a savage coast, that they might in strong faith and ardent hope lay deep the foundations of the temple of liberty, their faith would have become scepticism, and their hope despair, could they have foreseen that the day would ever arrive when their degenerate sons should be found seeking to extend...
Page 39 - ... party dissolved. We claim that we helped convert you. [Laughter and applause.] Please to put that down in the history that you are making, because, while we cannot claim much in our little state, we are very jealous of the little we can claim. I say that here are the declarations carefully made at the Exeter meeting, where we published an address and resolutions, and we had no occasion up to the time of the formation of the Republican party, and in all our labors in the Republican party, and...
Page 37 - ... Hampshire set an example of a conflict with party leaders that had never been set in this country before? (Applause.) We organized an opposition to the Democratic party in 1844-45, which we have never given up to this day. (Renewed applause.) And in 1845 we made a declaration of principles that constituted the essence of the Republican party which was formed at Philadelphia eleven years later. I have in my pocket, gentlemen, a call which will prove the truth of what I say. Here is an original...
Page 38 - Previous to that time many men had remonstrated at different times against the action of the Democratic party in New Hampshire, which was the strongest Democratic State in the Union ; but when they were denounced by the party leaders, and either passed over to the Abolitionists or to the Whig party, they acquiesced in being thus ranked. On the other hand, we insisted on organizing as Democrats. We refused to leave the Democratic party on account of our declaration of sentiments ; we claimed that...
Page 39 - ... Bartlett, the president of the Convention, who was sent to consult with me, that I should expect, if elected, to be found voting with such men as Joshua R. Giddings, and John G. Palfrey. [Applause.] I voted with them ; but at the next electing the Whigs of Massachusetts would not re-elect Mr. Palfrey. Please to put that down on record. [Laughter.] And in the revolution that took place in the United States, bear in mind that the humble state of New Hampshire placed the first anti-slavery senator...

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