A retrospective address read at the tercentenary commemoration of King Edward's school, Bury St. Edmunds

Front Cover
1850
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Parliament assembled considering that a great part of superstition and errors in Christian religion hath been brought into the minds and estimation of men by reason of the ignorance of their very true and perfect salvation through the death of Jesus Christ and by devising and phantasying vain opinions of purgatory and masses satisfactory to be done for them which be departed...
Page 36 - One happiness was, that he was a noted Cavalier, then the title of the king's friends in opposition to the rebels, who, from a precise cut they affected, were styled Roundheads. In the worst of those times, the master, in his family, used the forms of loyalty and orthodoxy, but being reputed little better than a malignant, he was forced to use outwardly an occasional conformity, by observing the church duties, and days of super-hypocritical fastings and seekings, wherewith the people, in those days,...
Page 90 - THE NEW CRATYLUS; or, Contributions towards a more accurate Knowledge of the Greek Language.
Page 9 - ... to good and godly uses, as in erecting of grammar schools to the education of youth in virtue and godliness, the further augmenting of the Universities, and better provision for the poor and needy...
Page 28 - I have so disposed the placing of my first book, that if a child should tear out every leaf so fast as he learneth, yet it shall not be greatly hurtful : for every new chapter repeateth and teacheth again all that went before.
Page 31 - Museum. with him. I may account the time I stayed with him amongst the best days of my life, whether I consider the comfort I received from his affectionate care of me, or my admirable proficiency in learning, during the short time I stayed with him, being about a year and a half; which was the rather observable, because this was the fifth school at which I had been a learner ; and yet, certainly, I here profited more in this short space, under his mild and loving government, beginning also myself...
Page 36 - Restoration and while our doctor was yet at school, the master took occasion to publish his cavaliership by all the ways he could contrive ; and one was putting all the boarders who were of the chief families in the country, into red cloaks, because the cavaliers about the court usually wore such ; and scarlet was commonly called the king's colour. Of these he had near thirty to parade before him through that observing town to church; which made no vulgar appearance.
Page 31 - I have been content to neglect my food sometimes, but often my sleep, for the furtherance of my studies. Mr. Dickenson did very seldom or rarely rebuke me for neglect of my book, but often for my sitting up too late at it. I was at my first coming into the school put into a form somewhat too high for me, by which means I made haste and took great pains to become equal to those with whom I was ranked. My employment also, about half a year before my departure thence to teach most of the upper end (for...
Page 91 - SEDGWICK, MA, FRS, Woodwardian Professor, and Fellow of Trinity College. The Fifth Edition. One Thick Volume, Crown Octavo, 12s. *** The present Edition is enlarged by the addition of a Preliminary Dissertation and Supplement, and consists, altogether, of 770 Pages. Of Induction; with especial reference to Mr. JS Mill's System of Logic. By WILLIAM WHE WELL, DD, Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. 2*. WHEWELL'S History of the Inductive Sciences. New Edition, Revised and Continued. Three Volumes,...
Page 92 - The survey, of which this is a copy, is the only one that has ever been made by professional Surveyors, and is beautifully engraved by Mr. Lowry. The forms of the mountains and valleys are for the first time...

Bibliographic information