A Ride Through the Disturbed Districts of New Zealand: Together with Some Accounts of the South Sea Islands : Being Selections from the Journals and Letters of Lieut., the Hon. Herbert Meade

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J. Murray, 1871 - New Zealand - 375 pages
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Page 35 - ... lost its shapeliness, and the clear white of the eye becomes dimmed and tarnished. Many are leaving off now the old barbarous unkempt shock head of hair, and comb their abundant locks in the more cleanly and becoming mode of the pakehas. They have generally small and well-shaped hands and feet. The custom of tattooing is now falling out of fashion amongst the rising generation of both sexes, and it is to be hoped that before many years have passed, the nickname of "Blue-lips" will no longer be...
Page 363 - ... hold, and saw the men who were in great number, and very industrious at their work ; we beheld them and respected them greatly. Then we looked around us and saw the very great guns and the swords in great number. We saw the chiefs of the ship and reverenced them greatly. Then we went again on deck and talked among ourselves and said : ' We young men of this generation were born in blessed times to see such a ship as this ; our fathers saw no such sight, we are living in better times, and we are...
Page 248 - Tell him to inform your good Queen Victoria that we will kill no more of her people but in future be good, and learn to obey the word of Jehovah.
Page 46 - Rotomahana over a smooth, hard flooring of a semitransparent white glazed surface, which paves the shores of the lake for a considerable distance. The water in the several basins is of the same deep blue as at the source, but the crystal margins, as well as the delicate crystallized tracery (reminding one of lace in high relief) which covers the whole of the broad flights of steps and curving terraces, are as white as driven snow, save in a few places, where, as if for the sake of contrast, a delicate...
Page 232 - But they have courted harsh criticisms by the unctuous language of cant which makes their conversation and writings too often offensive to all sensible men ; by their exaggerated accounts of sundry attempts on their lives, when, according to their own evidence, they were so helpless and unresisting that it seems hard to believe that a really serious attempt could have failed ; and lastly, by calling in the sword of the naval power for the punishment of their persecutors, thereby causing great scandal...
Page 232 - Amiteum shows that in the long run they are successful, though they may not necessarily be men of education and refinement. Whatever opinions may be held as to the propriety in a religious point of view of missionaries applying for armed protection, the duty of the naval officer is simply to assure himself that the applicants are British subjects, and that their complaints of outrage to life...
Page 310 - ... nearly every part to float a frigate. The stalactites and columns under the highdomed roof resemble gothic arches. The bright sunlight streaming through the narrow gateway of the cave, through the singularly clear water, and reflected up from the sparkling stones, and coral at the bottom full five fathoms deep, shed a beautiful series of lights and tints, shades of H delicate blue and green, over every part of the walls and vaulted roof.
Page 91 - The natives say that under these falls there once lived a terrible taniwha, a fabulous monster whose description answers in every point to that of our own dragon, excepting that he was unprovided with wings. We were assured that not many years ago one of the monster's teeth was found lying in the stream, but has since been lost. This is a pity, as there seems no reason to doubt that a fossil of some interest was actually found. As soon as the fiercest heat and glare of the day were past, we launched...
Page 47 - ... terraces, are as white as driven snow, save in a few places, where, as if for the sake of contrast, a delicate pink hue is introduced. Anything so fairy-like I should never have dreamt of seeing in nature. In shape most of the terraces somewhat resemble the curved battlements of ancient castles, though not so lofty, and the margins of the pools which they contain are disposed in almost symmetrical curves, each of whose extremities rests on the swell of those adjoining. The traveller may here...
Page 52 - ... mirth of the previous evening, they ate their suppers in solemn silence, seated in a motionless circle round the fire. We had a beautiful night, calm and starry, though moonless, and the lake was like glass. We were on the water again by nine, and long before midnight even half-way across Tarawera. As a touching piece of music that has struck some hidden chord will ring in the ear long after the sound itself has ceased, so the impression of that sunset scene remained pleasingly present to our...

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