A Second Treatise on the Bath Waters: Comprehending Their Medicinal Powers in General ..

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W. Meyer, Grove, and sold by all the booksellers in Bath, and by Robinsons, London, 1803 - Balneology - 120 pages
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Page 34 - ... water produces the gout, by which is meant, that when persons have a gouty affection shifting from place to place, and thereby disordering the system, the use of the Bath water will soon bring on general increase of action, indicated by a flushing...
Page 33 - ... affections of the head, stomach, and bowels. The principal advantage here is to be able to bring by warmth that active local inflammation in a limb which relieves all the other troublesome and dangerous symptoms. Hence it is commonly said that the Bath water produces the gout, by which is meant, that when persons have a gouty affection shifting from place to place, and thereby disordering the system, the use of the Bath water will soon bring on general increase of action...
Page 33 - ... (whose work on mineral waters, published at the beginning of the present century, is one of the best we possess in a practical point of view) on the cases of gout in which the Bath waters are calculated to be efficacious, is worth quoting. He says, "In gout the greatest benefit is derived from the Bath waters, in those cases where it produces anomalous affections of the head, stomach, and bowels. The principal advantage here is to be able to bring by warmth that active local inflammation in a...
Page 101 - ... of the former attack, and in preventing a return. " For these purposes a journey to Bath is generally proposed; about which physicians seem to be divided in their opinions; some thinking, that the drinking and bathing at Bath help to recover paralytics, whilst others are persuaded that they are the ready means of turning a palsy into an apoplexy.
Page 46 - ... which are surrounded with many muscles, and those of which the muscles are employed in the most constant and vigorous exertions. Such is the case of the vertebrae of the loins, the affection of which is named fumbagv ; or of the hip joint, when the disease is named ¿sc/iias or sciatica.
Page 34 - Bath water will soon bring on a generaV increase of action, indicated by a flushing in the face, fulness in the circulating vessels, and relief of the dyspeptic symptoms ; and the whole disorder will terminate in a regular fit of the gout in the extremities, which is the crisis always to be wished for.
Page 106 - They produce heat in the system, and when improperly administered they diminish the natural secretions of the body. They induce costiveness and the insensible perspiration is checked by them. Although they thus aggravate the symptoms of certain disorders, and are highly detrimental in certain states of the human constitution, in others their qualities are highly proper, and they prove of the most beneficial service.
Page 104 - A- violent head ache, oppression at the sto.mach, thirst and dry-ness of the tongue, giddiness and general heat over the system are the symptoms these waters produce when they disagree. When on the contrary, however, they produce a cheerfulness, do not oppress the stomach, cause no head ache and pass off readily 'by urine, then they agree.
Page 104 - ... apoplexy and death. Like steel medicines they have a peculiar action on the -heart and arteries, cause .a greater fulness and frequency of the pulse, and in a particular manner determine -the 'blood to the head. Although there are some...
Page 105 - Although there are some peculiarities in the composition of the •Bath waters which essentially .contribute te moderate the effects and restrain the action of the iron they contain, by preventing them from loading the stomach, yet like that metal given in our officinal preparations, they produce general good effects in weak, lax, and -pale habits, and iu chronical disorders proceeding from langour and deblity.

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