A Sermon, on the Death of Rev. Alonzo Hill, D.D.: Preached Before the Second Parish in Worcester, February 5th, 1871

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Chas. Hamilton, 1871 - Funeral sermons - 30 pages
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Page 6 - He has gone to his God ; he has gone to his home ; No more amid peril and error to roam ; His eyes are no longer dim ; His feet will no more falter ; No grief can follow him, No pang his cheek can alter. " There are paleness, and weeping, and sighs below ; For our faith is faint, and our tears will flow ; But the harps of heaven are ringing ; Glad angels come to greet him ; And hymns...
Page 11 - LIFE eternal ! How shall I express my thought of it ? It is not mere existence, however prolonged and free from annoyances. It is not the pleasure of the senses, however vivid. It is not peace. It is not happiness. It is not joy. But it is all these combined into one condition of spiritual perfection, — one emotion of indescribable rapture, — the peace after the storm has gone by, the soft repose after the grief is over, the joy of victory when the conflict is ended.
Page 11 - ... not peace. It is not happiness. It is not joy. But it is all these combined into one condition of spiritual perfection, — one emotion of indescribable rapture, — the peace after the storm has gone by, — the soft repose after the grief is over, — the joy of victory when the conflict is ended. It is that blessedness, that fulness of satisfaction, which Jesus felt when ' He rejoiced in spirit,' and with tender uplifting accents, bade his disciples be glad because their names were written...
Page 11 - It is not the pleasure of the senses, however vivid. It is not peace. It is not happiness. It is not joy. But it is all these combined into one condition of spiritual perfection, — one emotion of indescribable rapture, — the peace after the storm has gone by, — the soft repose after the grief is over, — the joy of victory when the conflict is ended.
Page 22 - I was laboring in a field which had so long belonged to him alone, that I was following methods and ideas unlike his own, emphasizing other duties, and approaching the great truths of religion from another point, seemed to cause him no uneasiness, and has cost me, I am sure, no word of sympathy which would otherwise have been mine. Though the two years had been extended to twenty, provided he had always found honesty of purpose on my part and a love of truth, I cannot believe that any thing could...
Page 5 - The catafalque was entirely covered with laurel, and in front was suspended a rich floral wreath surrounding a cross. At either end were stands of bouquets. On the top of the coffin rested a rich and elegant collection of fragrant flowers, comprising a crown, an anchor and wreaths. The pall bearers, eight in number, selected from the older members of the parish, were : John P. Kettell, Stephen Salisbury, John Barnard, Charles A. Hamilton, Dr.. George Chandler, FH Kinnicutt, Walter Bigelow, and Charles...
Page 21 - The luve and friendliness of so many hearts came upon him as a strange revelation. He thought it worth his sickness to learn how much kindness the world contained. Every fresh favor brought a fresh surprise, as though the giving forth of kindness was so habitual with him, and the thought of sacrificing himself so familiar, that the idea of sacrifice in his own behalf was hard to comprehend. To every expression of interest and eveiy token of love, he clung most fondly.
Page 19 - Had his convictions been even more positive than they were, his inborn tolerance would have forbidden him to withhold his sympathy from those who honestly held opposite opinions. To condemn was not in his nature. Charitable in his judgments always, he preferred, in all relations, to think the best and believe the best, of those with whom he came in contact. Just here we touch upon one of the finest traits of his character — his generosity of feeling. Rare though it...
Page 13 - ... whose very beauty it is that moves us to tears. Side by side lie the deep sources of smiles and tears ; we know not always from which the emotion springs, nor in which form it rightly clothes itself. The one or the other will do. The one, indeed, passes quickly into the other, as cloud and sunlight chase each other over the summer field. The highest joy has its touch of pathos iu it ; and so our deepest grief may have its hint of joy.
Page 14 - The highest joy has its touch of pathos iu it ; and so our deepest grief may have its hint of joy. If you bring both these emotions here to-day, my friends, if you look into each other's eyes with tears, yet press each other's hand as though to say — " it is well ; the good life is fitly ended ; its long years of faithful service and well-tried sympathy find at last their full reward in the loving memories of grateful hearts...

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