A short account of the representation of Scotland, in the parliament of Great Britain, with outlines of a plan for its reformation [by J. Borthwick].

Front Cover
G. Ramsay & Company for A. Constable & Company, 1813 - Scotland - 70 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 64 - Majesty on or before the First Day of May next on which Day the Union is to take place shall declare under the Great Seal of England that it is expedient that the Lords of Parliament of England and Commons of the present Parliament of England should be the Members of the respective Houses of the First Parliament of Great Britain...
Page 65 - Union, be considered as peerages of the united kingdom ; and that the peers of Ireland shall, as peers of the united kingdom, be sued and tried as peers, except as aforesaid, and shall enjoy all privileges of peers as fully as the peers of Great Britain ; the right and privilege of sitting in the House of Lords, and the privileges depending thereon, and the right of sitting on the trial of peers, only excepted...
Page 63 - THAT by virtue of this Treaty, Of the Peers of Scotland at the time of the Union Sixteen shall be the number to Sit and Vote in the House of Lords...
Page 63 - January last it is provided that by virtue of the said treaty of the peers of Scotland at the time of the union sixteen shall be the number to sit and vote in the House of Lords and forty-five the number of the representatives of Scotland in the House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain...
Page 65 - Scotland and their successors to their honours and dignities shall from and after the union be peers of Great Britain and have rank and precedency next and immediately after the peers of the like orders and degrees in England at the time of the union and before all peers of Great Britain...
Page 30 - Bellum plusquam civile," as Lucan expresses it. Why could not faction find other advocates ? but among the uncertainties of the human state, we are doomed to number the instability of friendship.
Page 64 - Houses of the First Parliament of Great Britain for and on the Part of England...
Page 66 - That any person holding any peerage of Ireland now subsisting, or hereafter to be created, shall not thereby be disqualified from being elected to serve if he shall so think fit, or from serving or continuing to serve, if he shall so think fit, for any county, city, or borough of Great Britain, in the House of Commons of the united kingdom...
Page 66 - Lords Temporal of Ireland elected for life by the Peers of Ireland, shall be the Number to sit and vote on the Part of Ireland in the House of Lords of the Parliament of the United Kingdom; and one hundred Commoners...
Page 63 - Britain, until the parliament of Great Britain shall make further provision therein, a writ do issue under the great seal of the United Kingdom directed to the privy council of Scotland, commanding them to cause sixteen peers who are to sit in the house of lords to be summoned to parliament, and forty-five members to be elected to sit in the house of commons of the parliament of Great Britain...

Bibliographic information