A Short Review of the Contents of the Report of the Commonwealth Commissioners on Sites for the Seat of Government of the Commonwealth (with Annexures)

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William Applegate Gullick, 1903 - 31 pages
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Page 21 - The Government then of the United States can claim no powers which are not granted to it by the Constitution; and the powers actually granted must be such as are expressly given, or given by necessary implication.
Page 20 - Commonwealth for public purposes: ii) Matters relating to any department of the public service the control of which is by this Constitution transferred to the Executive Government of the Commonwealth: iii) Other matters declared by this Constitution to be within the exclusive power of The Parliament.
Page 21 - Every power of the Parliament of a Colony which has become or becomes a State, shall, unless it is by this Constitution exclusively vested in the Parliament of the Commonwealth or withdrawn from the Parliament of the State, continue as at ' the establishment of the Commonwealth, or as at the admission or establishment of the State, as the case may be.
Page 20 - XXXI. The acquisition of property on just terms from any State or person for any purpose in respect of which the Parliament has power to make laws.
Page 19 - ... territory which shall have been granted to or acquired by the Commonwealth, and shall be vested in and belong to the Commonwealth, and shall be in the State of New South Wales, and be distant not less than one hundred miles from Sydney. Such territory shall contain an area of not less than one hundred square miles, and such portion thereof as shall consist of Crown lands shall be granted to the Commonwealth without any payment therefor. The Parliament shall sit at Melbourne until it meet at the...
Page 21 - The General Parliament shall have power to make Laws for the peace, welfare, and good Government of the Federated Provinces (saving the Sovereignty of England), and especially Laws respecting the following subjects : 1.
Page 21 - State. 111. The Parliament of a State may surrender any part of the State to the Commonwealth; and upon such surrender, and the acceptance thereof by the Commonwealth, such part of the State shall become subject to th> exclusive jurisdiction of the Commonwealth.
Page 19 - The seat of Government of the Commonwealth shall be determined by the Parliament, and shall be within territory which shall have been granted to or acquired by the Commonwealth, and shall be vested in and belong to the Commonwealth, and shall be in the State of New South Wales, and be distant not less than one hundred miles from Sydney.
Page 8 - Constitution, continue as at the establishment of the Commonwealth, or as at the admission or establishment of the State, as the case may be, until altered in accordance with the Constitution of the State.
Page 19 - To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding 10 miles square) as may, by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the Government of the United States...

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