A smaller history of England. (By P. Smith). Ed. by W. Smith. 9th thous

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Page 157 - Behold now this vast city, a city of refuge, the mansion-house of liberty, encompassed and surrounded with his protection ; the shop of war hath not there more anvils and hammers working, to fashion out the plates and instruments of armed justice in defence of beleaguered truth, than there be pens and heads there, sitting by their studious lamps, musing, searching, revolving new notions and ideas wherewith to present, as with their homage and their fealty, the approaching reformation : others as...
Page 165 - There is, sir, but one stage more, which, though turbulent and troublesome, is yet a very short one. Consider, it will soon carry you a great way ; it will carry you from earth to heaven ; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory.
Page 157 - are most of them old decayed serving-men, and tapsters, and such kind of fellows ; and,' said I, ' their troops are gentlemen's sons, younger sons and persons of quality; do you think that the spirits of such base and mean fellows will ever be able to encounter gentlemen, that have honour and courage and resolution in them...
Page 114 - Pluck up thy spirit, man, and be not afraid to do thine office. My neck is very short. Take heed therefore that thou strike not awry for saving of thine honesty.
Page 167 - EPITAPH ON CHARLES II. Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on, Who never said a foolish thing, Nor ever did a wise one.
Page 107 - I have often kneeled before him in his privy chamber on my knees, the space of an hour or two, to persuade him from his will and appetite : but I could never...
Page 112 - Provided always, that this Act, nor any thing or things therein contained, shall be hereafter interpreted or expounded that your Grace, your nobles and subjects, intend by the same to decline or vary from the congregation of Christ's Church in any things concerning the very articles of the Catholic faith of Christendom...
Page 129 - Be of good comfort, master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 148 - I was the justest judge that was in England these fifty years. But it was the justest censure in Parliament that was these two hundred years.
Page 153 - Put not your trust in princes, nor in the sons of men, for in them there is no salvation."*** He was soon able, however, to collect his courage; and he prepared himself to suffer the fatal sentence.

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