A Social History of England, 1200–1500

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Rosemary Horrox, W. Mark Ormrod
Cambridge University Press, Aug 10, 2006 - History
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What was life really like in England in the later Middle Ages? This comprehensive introduction explores the full breadth of English life and society in the period 1200-1500. Opening with a survey of historiographical and demographic debates, the book then explores the central themes of later medieval society, including the social hierarchy, life in towns and the countryside, religious belief, and forms of individual and collective identity. Clustered around these themes a series of authoritative essays develop our understanding of other important social and cultural features of the period, including the experience of war, work, law and order, youth and old age, ritual, travel and transport, and the development of writing and reading. Written in an accessible and engaging manner by an international team of leading scholars, this book is indispensable both as an introduction for students and as a resource for specialists.
 

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Contents

Social structure and
1
An age of deference
31
flee or withdraw themselves from their lords so long as
33
nobility knighthood and chivalry
35
often heard in the court of chivalry which was in
40
lordship and affinity
51
hierarchy and dissent
56
should be dearer to them than all their possessions But
59
rural labourers and craft workers
215
A consumer economy
238
Moving around
260
Work and leisure
276
Religious belief
293
recluses and friars
297
reforming bishops and the lateran decrees
301
religious enterprise and the voluntary sector
306

a crisis of authority
60
Welcom be thou to grene wode
62
The enterprise of war
74
their declining numbers by the fifteenth century suggest that the
90
Order and law
91
Social mobility
113
Town life
134
Besides their parish churches townsmen had recourse to other centres
143
The land
179
property rights in land
195
ownership of the land
200
Approximate
202
tenants and occupiers of the land
206
corpus christi
331
A magic universe
340
Renunciation
356
Ritual constructions of society
369
Identities
383
the sources for studying identities
386
the creation of identity
391
after the Black Death Whereas twelfthcentury chroniclers might
400
the ages of man
413
The wider world
435
Writing and reading
454
and 1390s who enacted their convictions by preparing and
463
Conclusion
473

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About the author (2006)

Rosemary Horrox is Fellow in History, Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge and lectures and writes extensively on later medieval English History. She is the author of Richard III: A Study of Service (1989) and of The Black Death (1994) and editor of Fifteenth-Century Attitudes (1994) and Beverley Minster: An Illustrated History (2000).

W. Mark Ormrod is Professor of Medieval History at the University of York and is a specialist in the history of later medieval England. He is the author of The Reign of Edward III (1990) and Political Life in Medieval England 1300–1450 (1995) and has edited (with Philip Lindley) The Black Death in England (1996) and (with Nicola McDonald) Rites of Passage: Cultures of Transition in Fourteenth-Century England (2004).

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