A Soldier-doctor of Our Army: James P. Kimball, Late Colonel and Assistant Surgeon-general, U.S. Army

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Houghton Mifflin, 1917 - 192 pages
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Page iv - Whose powers shed round him in the common strife, Or mild concerns of ordinary life, A constant influence, a peculiar grace ; But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for human kind, Is happy as a Lover ; and attired With sudden brightness, like a Man inspired ; And, through the heat of conflict, keeps the law In calmness made, and sees what he foresaw...
Page 182 - Even he, that leadeth an uncorrupt life : and doeth the thing which is right, and speaketh the truth from his heart...
Page 82 - Whose was the right and the wrong ? Sing it, O funeral song, With a voice that is full of tears, And say that our broken faith Wrought all this ruin and scathe, In the Year of a Hundred Years.
Page 82 - IN that desolate land and lone, Where the Big Horn and Yellowstone Roar down their mountain path, By their fires the Sioux Chiefs Muttered their woes and griefs And the menace of their wrath. "Revenge!" cried Rain-in-the-Face, " Revenge upon all the race Of the White Chief with yellow hair!
Page xiv - good fighters," from the days when John Kimball, of Ipswich, responded promptly to Paul Revere's cry. Their names are found in records of the Revolution, of the War of 1812, of the Civil War, and of the war with Spain.
Page 58 - Since the establishment of Fort Buford, in 1866, Sitting Bull, at the head of from sixty to seventy warriors, had been the terror of mail-carriers, wood-choppers and small parties in the vicinity of the post, and from 100 to 200 miles from it either way, up and down the Missouri River. During the time from 1866 to 1870, when the...
Page 60 - ... the vicinity of the post and from 100 to 200 miles from it either way, up and down the Missouri River. During the time from 1866 to 1870, when the autobiography was written, this band had several times captured and destroyed the mail and had stolen and run off over 200 head of cattle and killed near a score of white men in the immediate vicinity of the fort. The Unk-pa-pas are a tribe of the great Sioux Nation, living in the Yellowstone and Powder River countries. The book was brought into Fort...
Page 60 - Sitting Bull, at the head of from sixty to seventy warriors, had been the terror of mail-carriers, wood-choppers and small parties in the vicinity of the post and from 100 to 200 miles from it either way, up and down the Missouri River. During the time from 1866 to 1870, when the autobiography was written, this band had several times captured and destroyed the mail and had stolen and run off over 200 head of cattle and killed near a score of white men in the immediate vicinity of the fort. The Unk-pa-pas...
Page 50 - Michabo Ovisaketchek, he was originally the highest divinity of the Algonkins, though he appears to them likewise in their dreams as a mighty hunter of old, who in the moon of the falling leaf, ere he composes himself to his winter's sleep, fills his great pipe and takes a godlike smoke. The balmy clouds float over the hills and woodlands, filling the air with the haze of the
Page x - First Aid.' He was also general health officer of the garrison; was compelled to study and inspect water supply, to plant and irrigate fort gardens, and sometimes to manufacture ice. In addition, he often had a large free clinic among Indian neighbors, traders, and ranchmen. Yet this busy man, who happened to be interested also in ethnology, botany, geology, or biology, did not fail to make use of his rare opportunities for study. Our museums and libraries have been enriched by collections and monographs...

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