A Specimen of Persian Poetry, Or, Odes of Hafez: With an English Translation and Paraphrase, Chiefly from the Specimen Poeseos Persicae of Baron Revizky ... with Historical and Grammatical Illustrations and a Complete Analysis, for the Assistance of Those who Wish to Study the Persian Language

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editor, 1802 - Persian poetry - 86 pages
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Page 75 - Gah, or, place pf encampment for S the, the day, each load is depofited on a particular fpot, marked out by the mafter, to which the merchant •who own the goods repairs ; his baggage forms a crefcent; in the centre are placed the bedding and provifions ; a rope or line made of hair is then drawn round the whole, at the diftance of about three yards each way, which ferves to diftinguifh the feparate encampments. During the night, the beafts are all brought to their Rations, oppofite to the goods...
Page xi - European plunderers, that from being one of the richest countries in the world, it became the most deplorable. On the top is an admirable bust of the General, to which the Genius of the Company is pointing, while Fame is declaring his noble exploits, at the same time holding in her hand a shield, on which is written : — " For discipline established, fortresses protected, settlements extended, French and Indian armies defeated, and peace concluded in the Carnatic.
Page 73 - Euphrates, on the yth of Mohurrum. On this occafion, a boy reprefents the bride, decorated in her wedding garments, and attended by the females of the family chanting a mournful elegy...
Page 76 - It is customary to fix cords from the parapet walls (Deut. xxii. 8.) of the flat roofs across this court, and upon them to expand a veil or covering, as a shelter from the heat. In this area probably our Saviour taught. The paralytic was brought on to the roof by making a way through the crowd to the stairs in the gateway, or by the terraces of the adjoining houses. They rolled back the veil, and let the sick man down over the parapet of the roof into the area or court of the house, before Jesus.
Page 71 - ... by which means, the Cufians perceiving the fituation of affairs, regardlefs of the oaths and promifes they had made, treacheroufly left the unhappy and deluded Prince to his fate ; for which behaviour they are curfed by the Perfians and all the followers of Ali to this day.
Page 68 - Th' attendant colts, that bounding fly And frolic by the litter's side, Are dearer in Maisuna's eye Than gorgeous mules in all their pride. The watch-dog's voice, that bays whene'er A stranger seeks his master's cot, Sounds sweeter in Maisuna's ear Than yonder trumpet's long-drawn note. The rustic youth...
Page 77 - God's provideuce to the inquisitive; when they said to one another, Joseph and his brother are dearer to our father than we, who are the greater number; our father certainly maketh a wrong judgment.
Page 76 - ... been inhabited by Mahomedans: it is a fquare building of a noble fize, and has apartments for prayer on each fide ; in them are many infcriptions in the old Cufick character, which of themfelves denote the antiquity of the place; in the centre of the fquare is a large terrace, on which the Perfians perform their devotions, both morning and evening; this terrace is capable of containing upwards of two hundred perfons, and is built of ftone, raifed two feet and a half high from the ground; there...
Page 68 - ... colts, that bounding fly And frolic by the litter's side, Are dearer in Maisuna's eye Than gorgeous mules in all their pride. The watch-dog's voice, that bays whene'er A- stranger seeks his master's cot, Sounds sweeter in Maisuna's ear Than yonder trumpet's long-drawn note. The rustic youth, unspoiled by art, Son of my kindred, poor but free, Will ever to Maisuna's heart Be dearer, pampered fool, than thee ! VERSES OF YEZID TO HIS FATHER, MOWIAH, WHO REPROACHED HIM FOR DRUNKENNESS.
Page 73 - Perfians are all frantic even to emhufiafm, and they believe uniformly that the fouls of thofe flain during the Mohurrum will infallibly go that inftant into Paradife; this, added to their frenzy, which, for the time it lafts, is fuch as I never faw exceeded by any people, makes them defpife and even court death. Many there are who...

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