A Strike Made by Boyce's Big Weeklies ...

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Lakeside Press, 1894 - Fishing - 119 pages
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Page 38 - I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling, And here and there a foamy flake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel, And draw them all along, and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Page 20 - Now then the trout are yonder. We swing our line to the air, and give it a gentle cast toward the desired spot, and a puff of south wind dexterously lodges it in the branch of the tree. You plainly see it strike, and whirl over and over, so that no gentle pull...
Page 14 - Yes! let the rich deride, the proud disdain These simple blessings of the lowly train; To me more dear, congenial to my heart, One native charm, than all the gloss of art.
Page 13 - Of recreation there is none So free as Fishing is alone; All other pastimes do no less Than mind and body both possess : My hand alone my work can do, So I can fish and study too.
Page 19 - Still farther north is another stream, something larger, and much better or worse, according to your luck. It is easy of access, and quite unpretending. There is a bit of a pond, some twenty feet in diameter, from which it flows, and in that there are five or six half-pound trout, who seem to have retired from active life and given themselves to meditation in this liquid convent. They were very tempting but quite untemptable. Standing afar off we selected an irresistible fly, and with long line we...
Page 19 - No trout should have hesitated a moment. The morsel was delicious. The nimblest of them should have flashed through the water, broke the surface, and with a graceful but decisive curve plunged downward, carrying the insect with him. Then we should in our turn very cheerfully lend him a hand, relieve him of his prey, and admiring his beauty, but pitying his untimely fate, buried him in the basket. But he wished no translation. We cast our fly again and again; we drew it hither and thither ; we made...
Page 20 - ... want, you have caught fast at the first throw. You fear that the trout will be scared. You cautiously draw nigh and peep down. Yes, there they are, looking at you and laughing as sure as ever trout laughed! They understand the whole thing. With a very decisive jerk you snap your line, regain the remnant of it, and sit down to repair it, to put on another hook...
Page 21 - ... bait, or you will lose the end of all your fishing. At first, it is a puzzling business. A little practice sets things all right. Do you see that reach of shallow water gathered to a head by a cross-bar of sunken rocks ? The water splits in going over upon a slab of rock below, and forms an eddy to the right and one to the left Let us try a grasshopper there. Casting it in above, and guiding it by a motion of your rod, over it goes, and whirls out of the myriad bubbles into the edge of the eddy,...
Page 19 - ... liquid convent,, They were very tempting, but quite untemptable. Standing afar off, we selected an irresistible fly, and with long line we sent it pat into the very place. It fell like a snow-flake. No trout should have hesitated a moment. The morsel was delicious. The nimblest of them should have flashed through the water, broke the surface, and with a graceful but decisive curve plunged downward, carrying the insect with him. Then we should, in our turn, very cheerfully...
Page 20 - Was there ever anything so vexatious ? Would it be wrong to get angry ? In fact you feel very much like it. The very things you wanted to catch, the grasshopper and the trout, you could not ; but a tree, that you did not in the least want, you have caught fast at the first throw.

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