A Study of Occupations in the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Industry of Greater New York and an Apprenticeship Plan for Cutters ...

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Columbia University, 1914 - Apprentices - 83 pages
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Page 190 - The parties hereby establish a Joint Board of Sanitary Control, to consist of seven members, composed of two nominees of the manufacturers, two nominees of the unions, and three who are to represent the public...
Page 140 - ... months; about one year after arrival in the United States, at 21 years of age, entered the industry; learned the trade in the shop, beginning as a piece presser; worked two weeks for nothing as a learner, then 3 weeks at $3, then a few weeks at $3.50, then a few months at $5, and by the end of his first year had worked up to $8 as an upper presser on skirts...
Page 110 - The following report deals with occupations in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of Greater New York.
Page 143 - Italy in 1874; came to United States in 1877; went to work in 1886 pulling bastings at $1.25 to $2 per week; beginning in 1889 was for several years an operator on men's clothing at $3 to $9, and then jacket tailor at $10; then for 3 years a contractor in men's clothing line; in 1900, at 26 years of age, he entered this occupation, learning the trade by taking private lessons from a cutter in the latter's home; made $20 as cutter on men's clothing and $22 on cloaks and suits up to 1910; since the...
Page 142 - ... Poland; speaks, reads, and writes Yiddish, German, Polish, Russian, Hebrew, and "a little" English. INDIVIDUAL RECORDS OF CUTTERS. CUTTER No. 1. — Born in Italy in 1890; single; came to United States in 1900 and 6 years later, at 16 years of age, entered the industry, learning the trade in the shop ; began as a learner, making $5 to $8 the first year; worked one year as a canvas cutter at $10, then 2 years as a cloth cutter at $14 and $16; at the time of the strike in 1910 he went into business...
Page 142 - Detroit, where he secured a job as a mechanic in an automobile factory at $15; in 191 1 he returned to New York, making $25 as a cloth cutter since that date; attended public school in New York for about 8 years; speaks Yiddish and English, and reads and writes English. CUTTER No. 4. — Born in United States in 1891; single; responsible for partial support of 3 other members of family; in 1904 went to work as a stock clerk at $6, the next year making $8 ; the following year was office boy and apprentice...
Page 191 - ... clerks. It is now proposed to adopt an amendment to the protocol which shall provide for the establishment of a third agency correlative with the ones just mentioned : 3. The joint commission on industrial education, consisting of three nominees of the manufacturers, three nominees of the unions, and three representatives of the public, at least one of whom shall be a member of the board of education of Greater New York and one an expert in industrial education. The organization of the commission...
Page 190 - Union and the Cloak, Suit, and Skirt Manufacturers' Protective Association in New York City, September 2, 1910.
Page 144 - ... cutter on cloaks and suits. . . . "Cutter No. 10. — Born in Austrian Poland in 1892; ... in 1909 came to United States and entered this industry at once, at 17 years of age, learning the trade in the shop as a helper trimming cutter; began at $3 and was making $8 in 1910 as assistant trimming cutter; since the strike has been making $18 as trimming cutter. . . ." (Pp. 139, 140, 142, 143, I44-) ment; but such comparisons, to be of real value, must mark the difference between two points of progress....
Page 140 - ... was a shoemaker in Russia; came to United States in 1904, where he was a peddler with a pushcart for about a year and a half; after about 2 years in the United States, at 32 years of age, began as skirt under presser, learning the trade in the shop; worked 2 weeks for $5 per week, then several months at $8, then a year at $12, and by 1910 was making $16, and by 1912 became a jacket upper presser at $21; attended a Yiddish private school in Russia about 6 years; speaks, reads, and writes Russian...

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