A Study of the Affective Qualities

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Cornell university., 1906 - Emotions - 37 pages
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Page 6 - Feelings of strain and relaxation are always connected with the temporal course of processes. Thus, in expecting a sense-impression, we note a feeling of strain, and on the arrival of the expected event, a feeling of relaxation. Both the expectation and satisfaction may be accompanied at the same time by a feeling of excitement or, under special conditions, by pleasurable or unpleasurable feelings. Still, these other feelings may be entirely absent, and then those of strain and relaxation are recognized...
Page 6 - Again, the series of pleasurable and unpleasurable feelings is united with that of feelings of strain and relaxation, in the case of the affective tones of rhythms. The regular succession of strain and relaxation in these cases is attended by pleasantness, the disturbance of this regularity, by the opposite feeling, as when we are disappointed or surprised. Then, too, under certain circumstances the feeling of rhythm may be of either an exciting or a subduing character.
Page 37 - This is a hackneyed psychological doctrine, but on any theory of the seat of emotion it seems to me one of the most artificial and scholastic of the untruths that disfigure our science. One might as well say that the essence of prismatic color is pleasure and pain.
Page 6 - ... etc., but even the different cases of seriousness itself may vary in their quality. Again, the series of pleasurable and unpleasurable feelings, is united with that of feelings of strain and relaxation, in the case of the affective tones of rhythms. The regular succession of strain and relaxation in these cases is attended by pleasure, the disturbance of this regularity, by the opposite feeling, as when we are disappointed or surprised. Then, too, under certain circumstances the feeling of rhythm...
Page 37 - James says that the dual theory ' 'is a hackneyed psychological doctrine, but on any theory of the seat of emotion it seems to me one of the most artificial and scholastic of the untruths that disfigure our science ;"' when Ladd writes of the same theory that it is not only ' 'wholly inadequate to describe and explain the admitted data of consciousness, but even contradictory of those data," — that it "receives confutation at every point from the data of psychological science...
Page 11 - feeling" here and in similar instances hereafter is not intended by the observers to express any definite affective quality, but represents a loose use of the word common in conversational English, as well as in the earlier English psychology, in which it covers any mental state or process which is difficult of analysis. "It is plain...
Page 4 - In these experiments the evidence, so far as it goes, is decidedly in favor of the dual, and against the tridimensional theory of feeling. The evidence, however, does not go far enough. As the author himself points out, the number of experiments was limited, and they were made in two only, not in all three, of the Wundtian dimensions.
Page 10 - M. reported both tones unpleasant in 12 out ol the 56 pairs of tones given, and at the end of the hour said she had felt tired and stupid and had had great difficulty in keeping her attention upon the work. M. also thought that the musical interval formed by the notes influenced her judgment; when the second note made a pleasant interval with...
Page 3 - The tridimensional theory first appeared in the Grundriss der Psychologic, 1896. In 1899 Titchener published a criticism of the theory as here formulated, maintaining that strainrelaxation and excitement-depression are not pairs of maximally opposite qualities, but rather positives and negatives ; calling attention to the fact that Wundt's treatment of feeling in the...
Page 33 - Judgments of PU," these authors report, "were easy, direct and natural. It was exceptional to find any reason, any basis for these judgments: the stimuli were intrinsically pleasant and unpleasant, more pleasant or more unpleasant than their neighbors: and when a reason, or a basis was found, outside of intrinsic affective tone, it lay in the organic reaction set up by the stimulus employed.

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