A System of School Geography: Chiefly Derived from Malte-Brun, and Arranged According to the Inductive Plan of Instruction

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F.J. Huntington, 1833 - Geography - 288 pages
 

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Page 226 - And he will be a wild man ; his hand will be against every man, and every man's hand against him ; and he shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren.
Page 4 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 45 - During joint sessions, above, all members meet in the House chamber. Congress of the United States Congress of the United States makes the nation's laws. Congress consists of two bodies, the Senate and the House of Representatives. Both bodies have about equal power. The people elect the members of Congress. Although Congress's most important task is making laws, it also has other major duties. For example, the Senate approves or rejects the US President's choices for the heads of government departments,...
Page 106 - The first forsake their ordinary food, and live on the fruits and berries of the shrubs, through which they swim. The crab is found upon the trees, and the oyster multiplies in the forest. The Indian, who surveys from his canoe this confusion of earth and sea, suspends his hammock on an elevated branch, and sleeps without fear in the midst of the danger.
Page 240 - Ghuznee, the snow has been known to lie deep for some time after the vernal equinox. Traditions prevail of the city having been twice destroyed by falls of snow, in which all the inhabitants were buried.
Page 144 - The women of France take an active part in the concerns of life. At court, they are politicians; in the city, they are merchants and shopkeepers; in the country, they labor on the farms with the men. There is scarcely any operation in rural economy, in which they do not take a part: they may even be sometimes seen holding the plough in the field. They often perform long journeys alone, without the protection of men, and the discretion and energy of charapter which they display under such circumstances,...
Page 232 - Caucasus by their beauty and elegance. The men have a Herculean figure, a small foot and strong wrist, and they manage the sabre with wonderful dexterity. The women are delicate, and possess a pleasing and graceful form: their skin is white, with brown or black hair; their features are regular and agreeable, and they pay that attention to cleanliness which heightens the attractions of beauty. This is what renders the Circassian women so much admired, even among Europeans. Some travellers assert that...
Page 120 - The Spaniards, on the discovery of South America, found it in the possession of various tribes of Indians, generally of a more gentle and less warlike character than those which inhabited North America. They were perhaps of the same race, but the influence of a softer climate had subdued their vigor and courage. With the cross in one hand, and the sword in the other, the ruthless invaders took possession of the land. Peru, a populous empire of partly...
Page 155 - ... affording great facilities for commerce, and presenting strong inducements to navigation. In various parts of Greece, there still remain many interesting monuments of antiquity. The ruins of temples known to have been built 3000 years ago, exist at the present day. It is remarkable that these remains exhibit a style of architecture, common in that remote age, more truly chaste and beautiful, than has been since devised. After all the improvements of modern times, we are obliged to admit, that...

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