A Tale of a Tub, Written for the Universal Improvement of Mankind: To which is Added, An Account of a Battel Between the Antient and Modern Books in St. James's Library

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John Nutt, 1704 - 322 pages
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Page 138 - The most accomplished way of using books at present is two-fold ; either, first, to serve them as some men do lords, learn their titles exactly, and then brag of their acquaintance. Or, secondly, which is indeed the choicer, the profounder, and politer method, to get a thorough insight into the index, by which the whole book is governed and turned, like fishes by the tail.
Page 175 - ... content his ideas with the films and images that fly off upon his senses from the superficies of things ; such a man, truly wise, creams off nature, leaving the sour and the dregs for philosophy and reason to lap up. This is the sublime and refined point of felicity, called the possession of being well deceived ; the serene peaceful state of being a fool among knaves.
Page 54 - Once upon a time, there was a man who had three sons by one wife,* and all at a birth, neither could the midwife tell certainly which was the eldest. Their father died while they were young, and upon his deathbed, calling the lads to him, spoke thus: 'Sons, because I have purchased no estate, nor was born to any, I have long considered of some good legacies...
Page 59 - Proceed to the particular works of the creation, you will find how curious journeyman Nature has been, to trim up the vegetable beaux; observe how sparkish a periwig adorns the head of a beech, and what a fine doublet of white satin is worn by the birch.
Page 244 - Meanwhile the bee had acquitted himself of his toils, and, posted securely at some distance, was employed in cleansing his wings, and disengaging them from the ragged remnants of the cobweb.
Page 60 - If one of them be trimmed up with a gold chain, and a red gown, and a white rod, and a great horse, it is called a...
Page 27 - In the Attic commonwealth,* it was the privilege and birth-right of every citizen and poet to rail aloud, and in public...
Page 196 - I at all question, but they will furnish plenty of noble matter for such, whose converting imaginations dispose them to reduce all things into types; who can make shadows, no thanks to the sun, and then mould them into substances, no thanks to philosophy; whose peculiar talent lies in fixing tropes and allegories to the letter, and refining what is literal into figure and mystery.
Page 26 - ... all the virtues that have been ever in mankind are to be counted upon a few fingers, but his follies and vices are innumerable, and tune adds hourly to the heap.
Page 243 - In this mansion he had for some time dwelt in peace and plenty, without danger to his person by swallows from above, or to his palace by brooms from below...

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