A Text-book of Geology

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D. Appleton & Company, 1900 - Geology - 477 pages
 

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Page 2 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 119 - I with my hammer pounding evermore The rocky coast, smite Andes into dust, Strewing my bed, and, in another age, Rebuild a continent of better men. Then I unbar the doors: my paths lead out The exodus of nations: I disperse Men to all shores that front the hoary main.
Page 83 - C, impervious beds below and above A, acting as confining strata ; F, the height of the water level...
Page 62 - Mississippi brings the river almost to the danger line from Cairo to the Gulf. In the greatest floods, we also find that heavy rainfall over the great swamp region that extends along the Mississippi from the mouth of the Ohio to the Gulf of Mexico, is an important factor. Third in importance, as a factor in producing floods, is the Upper Mississippi, which, while never discharging a volume sufficient to produce of itself a flood, yet, rising later than the Ohio, serves to prolong the high water,...
Page 13 - These planes are marked by angular debris near the mountains, and by elongated upright calcareous concretions elsewhere. This remarkable combination of softness with great strength and stability of exposed surfaces is of inestimable value in a woodless country. In Asia thousands of villages are excavated in the most systematic manner at the base of cliffs of loess. Doors and windows pierced through the natural front give light and air to suites of rooms which are separated by natural walls, and plastered...
Page 13 - thousands of villages are excavated in the most, systematic manner at the base of the cliffs of Loess. Doors and windows pierced through the natural front give light and air to suites of rooms, which are separated by natural walls, often plastered with cement made from the Loess concretions. These are the comfortable dwellings of many millions of Chinese farmers, and correspond...
Page 321 - River group or series" are here given as the Richmond and Lorraine formations and Eden shale. Clarke and Schuchert did not use Hudson River in their revised classification of the New York series and formations in 1899, stating that "It is becoming increasingly evident that the great mass of shale in the Mohawk and Hudson river valleys which was designated at an early date by this term [Hudson River beds] is resolvable into horizons extending from the middle Trenton to and including the Lorraine beds....
Page 453 - But, on the other hand, there are strong reasons for thinking that the erosion of the Niagara gorge has not been uniform, and that the time is vastly greater.
Page 48 - But the mountain, falling, cometh to nought; And the rock is removed out of its place; The waters wear away the stones; The overflowings thereof wash away the dust of the earth: So thou destroyest the hope of man.
Page 6 - Circumstances were favorable therefore for the air to become filled with flying particles, caught up from the plowed fields, from the blackened prairies, from the public roads and from all sandy plains. These particles formed dense clouds and rendered it as impossible to withstand the blast as it is to resist the " blizzard " which carries snow in the winter over the same region. The soil to the depth of four or five inches in some places was torn up and scattered in all directions. Drifts of sand...

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