A Text Book of Ore Dressing

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McGraw-Hill book Company, 1909 - Ore-dressing - 702 pages
 

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Page 98 - The lifting surfaces arc in the form of an involute of a circle, the radius of which is equal to the distance between the stamp stem and the cam shaft center to center.
Page 394 - ... field of much higher intensity. This intensity of the magnetic field depends: 1. On the size of the magnet. 2. On the shape of the magnet. 3. On the distance between the magnet and the body to be attracted. 4. On the number of...
Page 210 - The force which produces the current is the fall of the water from a higher to a lower level, and the slope is an indication of the amount of this force. Other conditions being the same, the steeper the slope the more rapid will be the current. The chief element which retards the current is the friction between the water and the bed of the stream. This friction increases as the surface in contact with the water increases, and is, therefore, greatest where the width is greatest, and...
Page 318 - ... clearly indicated. This has been recognized in some quarters, but a wider use than has hitherto been accorded it appears to hold out favorable inducements. This seems to be a field eminently suited for the English methods of jigging — one that is not and cannot be filled by the Continental system. (8) The arguments that have been advanced for the adoption of the English system on the ground that equal-settling ratios, many times larger than those obtainable under free-settling conditions, exist...
Page 108 - In this connection it is well to keep in mind the fact that the body is an agglomerate of organs and that the conditions dealt with by the physician often involve gross alterations in the elements of this organ-agglomerate. It is surely not surprising, that somatic disease is often accompanied by alterations in the " self " which have a peculiar tendency to...
Page 316 - ... slimes should of course be removed; and if it is more convenient to send egg size, nut size, pea size, and sand size, each to its own jig, the suitable screens should be provided for this purpose and a hydraulic separator for grading the finest sizes. But if, on the other hand, the factor is below 3.70, then the jigging of mixed sizes cannot give perfectly clean work, and the separation will be approximate only. To effect the most perfect separation, close sizing must be adopted, and the closer...
Page 591 - ... from the description of the behaviour of the single individual to the discussion of markets we naturally make other subsidiary assumptions — there are two individuals or many, the supply is in the hands of a monopoly or of a multiplicity of sellers, the individuals in one part of the market know or do not know what is going on in other parts of the market, the legal framework of the market prohibits this or that mode of acquisition or exchange, and so on.
Page 1 - A course in which a detailed study is pursued of the various processes of mechanically separating and saving valuable minerals from the valueless gangue of ores, whereby the valuable minerals are concentrated into smaller bulk and weight by discarding a large portion of the waste. The principal subjects treated are: Preliminary and final crushing by means of rock-breakers, steam and gravity stamps with amalgamation; rolls, Chilian, Huntington; tube and ball mills; screen sizing and classifying; sand...
Page 338 - Figure 4 is an ideal sketch of what happens at the discharging corner of a Wilfley table. Running from coarse on the lower edge to fine on the upper, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H represent the different sizes of galena. It appears that they arrange themselves approximately according to this order on the Wilfley table. In like manner, the quartz grains arrange themselves approximately in order of size, beginning at the lower edge with the largest grade and running smaller and smaller upwards, as indicated...
Page 277 - The work of hydraulic jigs depends, as a rule, upon the action of two currents of water, an upward and a downward, alternating with each other in quick succession, upon a bed of sand supported by a screen. Sands of two or more specific gravities, during the upward movement, called pulsion, arrange themselves according to the law of hindered settling (see 466).

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