A Text-book of Pathology: With a Final Section on Post-mortem Examinations and the Methods of Preserving and Examining Diseased Tissues

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William Wood, 1911 - 1114 pages
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Contents

Regeneration of epithelium
72
Mitosis in granulation tissue
73
Regeneration of connective tissue
74
Developing bloodvessels in newformed tissue 7 5
75
Regeneration of fat tissue
77
CHAPTER V
81
Healing of a wound of the cornea
82
Emigration of leucocytes
84
Exudative inflammation
85
Fibrin in inflammatory exudate
86
Fibrin forming around dead cells
87
Bacterial embolus in the liver
88
Bacterial embolus in the liver with necrosis
90
Granulation tissue
91
Granulation tissue
92
Fibroblasts of new connective tissue
93
Cicatricial tissue
94
Regeneration of epithelium
95
Phagocytes
100
Giant cells
101
Giant cells and newformed fibrous tissue around a foreign body
102
Giant cells around foreign bodies
103
Osteoclasts
104
General considerations 81 Types of inflammatory reaction of
110
Thomas frogplates
111
Entamoeba histolytica
116
Trypanosoma brucei
118
Treponema pallidum
119
Trichomonas vaginalis
120
Coccidium oviforme
121
Distoma hepaticum
123
Head of Ttenia solium
124
Tania mediocanellata Head and proglottides
125
Scolices of Taenia eehinococcus
126
Ascaris lumbricoides
127
Eggs of nematode worms
128
Trichocephalus dispar
129
Trichina spiralis
130
Filaria sanguinis hominis
131
Sarcoptes hominis
132
CHAPTER VI
133
Bacteria morphology physiology and distribution 133 Clas
143
CHAPTER VIII
150
CHAPTER IX
197
General considerations 197 Suppurative and allied
221
CHAPTER X
320
General considerations 320 Malformations involving single
327
The nature and characters of tumors in general 336 Etiology of tumors
344
CHAPTER XII
417
Forms of poisons 417 The lesions induced
426
General Diseases 429 Cachexia strumipriva myxcedema 429 Exophthalmic
440
General Considerations
451
CHAPTER II
481
General characteristics of the spleen 499 Malformations
500
CHAPTER IV
512
CHAPTER V
518
CHAPTER VI
579
in pulmonary tuberculosis 628 Secondary lesions in pulmonary tuberculosis
629
The mediastinum 636 The pleura hydrothorax 636 Hydropneumo
634
CHAPTER VII
643
CHAPTER VIII
708
Malformations 708 Wounds rupture and luemorrhage 708 Anemia
714
CHAPTER IX
746
The vulva maliformations 793
793
Condensing osteitis
885
Tuberculous osteitis
887
Necrosis of bone
890
Caries of vertebrae
891
Rachitic bone
892
Rickets
893
Craniotabes
894
Thorax of rachitic child
895
Achondroplasia
896
Hyperplastic bone marrow
898
Sarcoma of bone
901
Myelogenic sarcoma of sternum
902
CHAPTER XIV
908
Pachymeningitis interna hemorrhagica chronic
909
Brain sand
910
Psammoma of dura mater
912
Acute exudative meningitis
915
Acute exudative meningitis
916
Patty degeneration in pia mater
917
Miliary tubercle of pia mater
918
Miliary tubercle of ependyma of lateral ventricle
919
Endothelioma of cerebellum
920
Endothelioma of pia mater
921
Plates of bone in pia mater spinalis
923
Acute ependymitis
925
Congenital hydrocephalus
926
Hydromyelia
929
False heterotopia
930
Atrophy of brain convolutions
932
Diagram of circle of Willis
933
Large haemorrhage in brain
937
Section of cord showing haemorrhage into gray matter
938
Hasmatomyelopore
939
Degenerated brain tissue in embolic softening
941
Neurone from human cerebral cortex
944
Neurone from cerebellar cortex of guineapig
945
Neuroglia cell
946
Secondary descending degeneration
953
Secondary ascending degeneration
954
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
956
Fig Page 666 Posterior spinal sclerosis 361
957
Tabes dorsalis
962
Degenerated tissue from acute myelitis
966
Poliomyelitis anterior
967
Acute anterior poliomyelitis
968
Landrys paralysis
969
Degeneration of nerve fibres
970
Multiple sclerosis in spinal cord
973
Solitary tubercle of cerebellum
974
Syringomyelia
978
THE METHOD OF MAKING POSTMORTEM EXAMINATIONS AND
983
Side view of human brain
993
Method of opening brain
994
Method of opening brain
995
Schematic picture of brain
996
Brain mantle seen from below
997
Outlines of sections of spinal cord
1000
Heart showing lines for incision
1006
Heart opened exposing aortic valves
1007
Heart opened exposing mitral valve
1008
CHAPTER II
1027
General Methods of Preserving Pathological Specimens and Preparing them
1035
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Page 704 - ... from the size of a pin's head to that of a pea ; scattered through a large body of sand or clay ; and in this state it is called by the Mandingoes sanoo munko,
Page 1014 - Not infrequently one or more spheroidal or flattened so-called accessory spleens are found in the vicinity of the spleen ; they vary in size from that of a pea to that of a walnut.
Page 945 - While some terminate in the gray matter in the immediate vicinity of their cells of origin, it is the axones that make up the bulk of the white matter of the brain, cord, and peripheral nerves.
Page 980 - The tumor was composed of fusiform cells, of nerve ganglion cells, of tubules and acini lined with cylindrical epithelium, .and of more irregular spaces filled with large polygonal cells. Coats' describes a tumor, three inches in diameter, growing into the third ventricle, the aqueduct of Sylvius, and the fourth ventricle. It was composed of fusiform cells, of tubules lined with cylindrical epithelium, of irregular masses of epithelium, of cartilage, and of smooth muscle. Hypertrophy with cystic...
Page 796 - ... between the anterior wall of the rectum and the posterior wall of the vagina. The swollen ovary feels like an enlarged gland, is convex, and sometimes throbs and pulsates beneath the finger.
Page 943 - Nissl method from the standpoint of pathology lies in the fact that when subjected to a given technique, a given type of nerve cell presents always the same appearance, and that this appearance furnishes a norm of comparison with cells showing pathological changes which have been subjected to the same technique.
Page i - A Handbook of Pathological Anatomy and Histology with an Introductory Section on Post-Mortem Examinations and the Methods of Preserving and Examining Diseased Tissues, by Francis Delafield, MD. LL. D., Emeritus Professor of the Practice of Medicine. College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University. New York, and T. Mitchell Prudden, MD, LL.
Page 307 - They occur in and between the epithelial cells of the epidermis and free in the superficial lymph vessels and spaces of the corium. The great majority of the bodies vary from two to seven microns in diameter, and stain delicately but sharply with methylene blue. They form a series of bodies, including the formation of definite rosettes with numerous...
Page 907 - They are most frequently found in the knee ; next in order of frequency in the elbow, hip, ankle, shoulder, and maxillary joints. They may be single or in hundreds. Their size varies from that of a pin's head to that of the patella. They are polypoid, rounded, egg-shaped, or almondshaped ; their surface is smooth or faceted, or rough and mulberry-like. They are composed of fibrous tissue, cartilage, and boiie iu various proportions.

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