A Text-book of Plane Surveying

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American Book Company, 1896 - Logarithms - 485 pages
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Page 384 - The logarithm of a number is the exponent of the power to which it is necessary to raise a fixed number, in order to produce the first number.
Page 347 - But there are many little lakes or ponds which are gradually disappearing, and the shore proprietorship advances pari passu as the waters recede. If these are of any considerable size — say, even a mile across— there may be questions of conflicting rights which no adjudication hitherto made could settle. Let any surveyor, for example, take the case of a pond of irregular form, occupying a mile square or more of territory, and undertake to determine the rights of the shore proprietors to its bed...
Page 214 - navigable rivers within the territory occupied by the public lands shall remain and be deemed public highways; and, in all cases where the opposite banks of any streams not navigable belong to different persons, the stream and the bed thereof shall become common to both;" and of this provision it was said in St.
Page 340 - ... lights of which the case admits, where the original lines were. The mistake above alluded to is supposed to have found expression in our legislation; though it is possible that the real intent of the act to which we shall refer is not what is commonly supposed. An act passed in 1869 (Compiled...
Page 341 - Third. Any extinct quarter-section corner, except on fractional lines, must be re-established equidistant and in aright line between the section corners; in all other cases at its proportionate distance between the nearest original corners on the same line.
Page 220 - ... in whose district suc,h land is situated, and where the change is intended to be made, under such rules and regulations as the President may prescribe, to cause the...
Page 344 - It is always possible when corners are extinct that the surveyor may usefully act as a mediator between parties, and assist in preventing legal controversies by settling doubtful lines. Unless he is made for this purpose an arbitrator by legal submission, the parties, of course, even if they consent to follow his judgment, cannot, on the basis of mere consent, be compelled to do so ; but if he brings about an agreement, and they carry it into effect by actually conforming their occupation to his...
Page 346 - ... bank owners are fixed by their purchase; when making that, they have a right to understand that all land between the meander lines, not separately surveyed and sold, will pass with the shore in the government sale and, having this right, anything which their purchase would include under it cannot afterward be taken from them. It is believed, however, that the Federal courts would not recognize the applicability of this rule to large navigable rivers, such as those uniting the Great Lakes. On...
Page 344 - The subject to which allusion will now be made, is taken up with some reluctance, because it is believed the general rules are familiar. Nevertheless, it is often found that surveyors misapprehend them, or err in their application; and as other interesting topics are somewhat connected with this, a little time devoted to it will probably not be altogether lost. The subject is that of meander lines. These are lines traced along the shores of lakes, ponds, and considerable rivers, as the measures of...
Page 346 - ... for the reason that the rights of the bank owners are fixed by their purchase : when making that, they have a right to understand that all land between the meander lines, not separately surveyed and sold, will pass with the shore in the government sale ; and having this right, anything which their purchase would include under it cannot afterward be taken from them.

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