A Textbook in the Principles of Science Teaching

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Macmillan, 1917 - Science - 486 pages
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Page 488 - EDITED BY PAUL MONROE, PH.D. Professor of the History of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; Author of "A Text-Book in the History of Education," "Brief Course in the History of Education," etc. The need of such work is evidenced: By the great mass of varied educational literature showing an equal range in educational practice and theory; by the growing importance of the school as a social institution, and the fuller recognition of education as a social process ; and by the great increase...
Page 316 - This list of required topics is not intended to include all the material for the year's work. It is purposely made short, in order that each teacher may be free to supplement it in a way that fits his individual environment. It does include those topics which all agree are essential to a first course in physics, and which are capable of comprehension, at least to the extent specified in number 6 of the definition of the unit, by boys and girls of high school age.
Page 77 - As finding the place of a new fact or phenomenon in the general system is always the final step for the scientist in the treatment of a problem, so it should be for the student in the science class. Accordingly, the logical position of a new fact should not be given by the teacher at the start, as so often it is, but should be found by the class after they have studied...
Page 317 - Dew point; clouds and rain. *2O. Fusion and solidification; heat of fusion. 21. Heat transference by conduction and convection. 22. Heat transference by radiation. 23. Qualitative description of the transfer of energy by waves. 24. Wave length and period of waves. 25. Sound originates at a vibrating body and is transmitted by waves in air. *26. Pitch and period of sound. *27.
Page 316 - The class work should aim to build up in the student's mind clear concepts of physical terms and quantities, and an intuitive appreciation of the general principles which make up the syllabus. He must be trained in the use of those principles in the solution of simple, practical, concrete numerical problems. 7. Examinations will be framed to test the student's understanding of and ability to use the general principles in the required syllabus, as indicated in 6. 8. The teacher is not expected to...
Page 317 - ... is transmitted by waves in air. 26. Pitch and period of sound. 27. Relation between the wave length of a tone and the length of a string or organ pipe. 28. Resonance. 29. Beats. 30. Rectilinear propagation of light ; pin-hole camera. 31. Reflection and its laws ; image in a plane mirror. 32. Refraction, and its use in lenses; the eye, the camera. 33.
Page 297 - What is the cause of the sensation called ' pins and needles'? What is the cause of waterspouts? What is the cause of hiccup? If a towel be wetted with water, why does the wet portion become darker than before? What is meant by Lancashire witches? Does the dew rise or fall? What is the principle of the hydraulic press? Is there more oxygen in the air in summer than in winter? What are those rings which we see round the gas and sun?
Page 20 - can be caught by children only when they investigate, learn and apply in order to get results that appeal to them personally as worthy of their efforts. . . The scientific method is essentially a method of solving problems that present either a utilitarian or an intellectual appeal ; therefore, the true way to induct beginners into its use is to confront them with such problems, and guide them in using the scientific method in reaching their solutions.
Page 488 - Brief Course in the History of Education," etc. The need of such work is evidenced : By the great mass of varied educational literature showing an equal range in educational practice and theory; by the growing importance of the school as a social institution, and the fuller recognition of education as a social process; and by the great increase in the number of teachers and the instability of tenure which at the same time marks the profession. The men who need it are : All teachers, professional...
Page 490 - C. Riborg. The teaching of physics for purposes of general education. New York, The Macmillan company, 1912. xxv, 304 p. 12. (Teachers' professional library, ed. by NM Butler.) Bibliography: p. 291-99. The first part of this book traces the development of the present situation. The second traces the origin of physics, and seeks to establish its leading characteristics and to define its possibilities as a means of general education. In the third part the purpose of physics teaching is stated, and...

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