A Time to Learn: Creating Community in America's High Schools

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Dutton, 1998 - Education - 230 pages
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An educator reveals how we can turn high schools into communities where students develop into active and valued members of society

In 1992, George Wood left the ivory tower of academia to become the principal of a poor and struggling high school in rural Ohio. In a few short years, he made Federal Hocking High one of the top schools in its region -- and a model for what can be done when a principal, teachers, parents, and students put their minds together to creating change. As a result of Wood's innovative and sometimes radical ideas, attendance, GPAs, and graduation rates are all up at Federal Hocking High.

It has been acknowledged that American education must radically change if the country wants to compete in the 21st century. This unique book about public schooling does not focus on policy decisions or legislative debate, but rather on the real lives of a dedicated principal and the teachers and students in his school. Where most books on education focus solely on what's wrong with our schools, A Time to Learn focuses on how to make it right. It is a clarion call to anyone who believes in the future of our children.

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Contents

CHAPTER
36
CHAPTER THREE
57
CHAPTER FOUR
89
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

George Wood has been principal of Federal Hocking High School in Stewart, Ohio, since 1992 and is also director of The Forum for Education and Democracy (). He is coeditor, with Deborah Meier, of (2004) as well as the author of Schools that Work (1994) and numerous essays and articles on education and democracy. He lives in Amesville, Ohio, and is married to Marcia Burchby, who is a kindergarten teacher. They are the parents of two FHHS graduates, Michael (2000) and John (2005), and the foster parent of another, Ivan (1996).

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