A Translation of the Inferno of Dante Alighieri, in English Verse: With Historical Notes, and the Life of Dante. To which is Added, a Specimen of a New Translation of the Orlando Furioso of Ariosto, Volumes 1-2

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C. Dilly, 1785 - English poetry
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Page 387 - Intercourfe we mall have by being united together in Society, will fupply us with greater Means and Occafions to wreak our Spite upon each other. For Society puts us within each other's Reach, and by that means, if we are Enemie.s renders us more dangerous to one another) like two...
Page 224 - And boldly thus address'd my hardy crew : 'While yet your blood is warm, my gallant train, Explore with me the perils of the main, And find new worlds unknown to mortal view. Recall your glorious toils, your lofty birth, Nor like the grov'ling herds, ally'd to earth, To1 base despondence quit your lofty claim.' They heard, and thro' th' unconquerable band My potent words the living ardor fann'd, And instant breath'd around the fervent flame.
Page iv - Translation of the Inferno of Dante Alighieri, in English Verse, with historical Notes, and the Life of Dante : to which is added, a Specimen of a new Translation of the Orlando Furioso of Ariosto, by Henry Boyd, AM Lond.
Page 337 - The first sad night I passed unknown to sleep, The circling hours beheld me wake and weep ; Till through an opening of my gloomy jail, When now the flaming couriers of the night On day's fair confines quenched their waning light, The morning stole with ominous dawn and pale. ' That moment first beheld my eyelids close, A short, sad respite to my lingering woes ; But dire prophetic dreams the curtain drew, And shewed my doom at large ! Methought I...
Page 390 - ... to drive us to madnefs, dcfpair, and fui-r cide : What then muft be the confequence when we are wholly abandoned to them, and left the eternal victims of their unfated malice ! with what an hellifh rage will they fly upon our guilty and timorous fouls, where there is fo much fuel for their injected fparks of horror to take fire on ! — As the indulgence of rancour and malice natural'y drives «s to fuch malignant fociety...
Page 329 - ... furious cannibal his captive tore. The Furies thus, by sad Ismeno's flood, Saw Tydeus quench his ire in hostile blood. ' 0 thou ! whom man's benignant race disclaims...
Page 334 - ... will flow ; I know not whence thou art, nor whose command Sent thee, a mortal, to the frozen strand, To view the wonders of the world below. ' Thou speak'st the Tuscan tongue ! then, mortal, hear A story yet unknown to human ear ! The sad detail of Ugolino's fate : Here the cursed prelate, by whose arts I fell, Still feeds my vengeance in the depths of hell, The joint betrayer of my parent state. ' Haply thy young remembrance yet may trace The deadly rancour of Sismondi's race, And how this prelate...
Page 27 - A reed (tuck into the ground continues to burn like a flambeaux. An hole made under the furface of the earth immediately becomes a furnace, anfwering all the purpofes of a culinary fire.
Page 383 - Devils are undoubtedly very fevere, but wrath and envy, mab'ce and revenge, muft be much more fo; they are both the nature and the plague of Devils ; they are the creatures of thofe curfed affections...
Page 389 - ... of a confcience brooding over its eternal wounds, than the inceffant and horrible vexation of fuch a malignant confraternity ! for, though we, who are only fpe&ators of corporeal agency, cannot fee how fpirits act upon each other, yet there is no doubt but the plagues inflicted by fpirits upon fpirits, are as immediate as thofe inflicted by body upon body...

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