A treatise of fruit-trees

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Printed for the author, 1757 - Gardening - 392 pages
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Page 89 - ... horizontal or declining, for which reason I think it best to leave vigorous standards unpruned till they have blossomed, or only to take out some of the upright branches that would gall others. " Perhaps it may be said, that if two of those trees were left, the one cut and the other uncut, the former would produce better fruit when it bears than the latter : I grant it will, were the latter never cut at all ; and that pruning after blossoming, as I hinted before, is very serviceable to standards...
Page 94 - ... management it may be reasonably expected that there will be an equal number of new branches on each side. " Now if no more shoots be produced by leaving the branches longer on one side than they are on the other which was cut short, how can one method weaken a tree more than another ? " The consequences indeed of leaving the branches long, will be this, they will have produced shoots at more proper distances, and cover the wall sooner with such as will earlier bear than those on the other side,...
Page 93 - ... quantity out of the trees, because, as they say, the wood is too strong, or that there is too much left. " To cut in winter to gain wood, and to cut wood out in the summer, because, forsooth, it is too strong, is, I think, acting contrary to nature, and spending sap unnecessarily; for as the strength of the wood, and the growing of the branches too near each other, are entirely owing to the winter cutting, if the branches were then placed horizontally on the wall, there would be no occasion to...
Page 95 - ... short cutting, are not so apt to bear. ' . " At the request of a certain gentleman, I shortened the branches of a peach tree on one side, according to the rules laid down by the best authors; but the other side I nailed to the wall, without shortening one branch, which is a method I have practised many years. The crop of fruit, as well as the number of young branches on that side of the tree where the shoots were not shortened, were so greatly preferable to those on the other, that the gentleman...
Page 93 - ... nature, and spending sap unnecessarily; for as the strength of the wood, and the growing of the branches too near each other, are entirely owing to the winter cutting, if the branches were then placed horizontally on the wall, there would be no occasion to cut out too much in the summer, and the sap which the roots collected from the earth, would form new branches more fit for the production of fruit, and in such places where they might continue ; so by this method the trees will bear, and the...
Page 88 - Nature best shews us the time and manner of pruning. " If there are two apple, pear, plum or cherry trees, equal in health and strength at one year old, after grafting, let them remain some years after in the same stations, having sufficient space to extend their branches in ; and one of them be pruned and the other not, but suffered to grow in a shape quite rude and natural, the latter will produce fruit much earlier than the other, though perhaps its branches will not be in so regular a position...
Page 285 - Peaches and nectariries are much the beft when they are ripe enough to fall from the healthy branches of their own accord, and never ought to be gathered too early. If apricots in growing don't touch each other, they feldom drop off the tree before they are too ripe for moft palates, nay...
Page 287 - As pears are the beft fruit the winter months afford, they are worthy of the greateft care in preferving ; and, if rightly ordered, may be kept fit for ufe till the next feafon will furnifh us with a new fupply ; which may be eafily done, if the following directions are carefwlly obferved.
Page 289 - ... let them be opened one by one as they are wanted for ufe; if a few do happen to rot, the mofs will receive their moifture, and prevent them from injuring the others. Such as are defigned to be ufed firft after they have been couched, may be laid upon a boarded floor or (helves in the fruitery, where they ought to be kept dry by opening the windows in fine days ; but in rain or frofty weather the windows muft be kept clofe ftopt, to prevent the air from having any effeft upon the fruit, and if...
Page 291 - ... They ought to be laid in a box or tub, with a covering of moift bran in the bottom, after that a fingle layer of fruit, but not to touch each other, and upon them lay a covering of bran an inch thick. After that, five or fix layers of each may be laid alternately, but there muft be a covering of bran at the top, and as it becomes drier, there muft be more water poured upon them ; by this means they will be in perfection in fourteen days time; but if they be lay'd thin upon dry ftraw, they will...

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