A Treatise of the Law Relative to Merchant Ships & Seamen, in Six Parts: I. Of the Owners of Merchant Ships. II. Of the Board of Trade--local Marine Boards--mercantile Marine Offices and Naval Courts. III. Of the Persons Employed in the Navigation of Merchant Ships, and of the Conveyance of Passengers. IV. Of the Carriage of Goods in Merchant Ships. V. Of the Hiring and Wages of Merchant Seamen. VI. Of General Average--salvage--collision--and Maritime Liens

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Shaw and Sons, 1881 - Maritime law - 987 pages
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Contents

Remarks on Cases cited
277
Chandler 59
280
Bernard
283
Of the Commencement of the Voyage
297
Owners of San Roman 335
301
Of the Course of the Voyage 806
308
The Masters Duty as respects the Cargo in the course of
319
Imrie viii 100 607
325
CHAPTER VI
327
LightningFire 888
333
SECTS PAGE
338
CHAPTER IX
346
Moorhouse
348
Time and Manner of its Payment Of the words on payment
354
Equivalent Recompense in the Nature of Freight to which
361
Of Freight when part of the goods only have been brought
368
When the Right to Freight commences 891
391
Of the Jurisdiction exercised by the Court of Admiralty respect
398
Of Stoppage in Transitu and herein
401
CHAPTER XI
436
Of Blockade of the Port of Destination
442
Recent Decisions
448
Provisions for the protection of Seamen and the preservation
457
SECTS PAGE
459
The Time at which Payment is to be made
471
CHAPTER m
477
Forfeiture for refusing to assist the Master in defending the Ship
487
By Action at Common Law against the Master or Owners
493
OF GENERAL AVERAGE SALVAGE COLLISION AND MARITIME LIEN
497
Ripley 520524
502
Remarks
524
How settled and recovered in the case of Dispute 580
530
Of Salvage and herein
536
Of Salvage by chartered Ship Salvage Agreements Salvage
547
SECT PAGB
550
Of Salvage in the United Kingdom 17 18 Vict c 104
561
Of Salvage on Recapture
567
De la Arroyave 185244
569
CHAPTER
573
Clayton 47
578
Enactments and Regulations as to Lights c
581
Law of England as Administered in Common Law Courts
591
Of their Duration and Extinguishment
601
Of Procedure in Admiralty to enforce them
607
Of the Certificate of Registry 46
645
Chalacombe ex p 467
745
Thorn 459 464
950

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Page 433 - India warrants ; warehouse keepers certificates ; warrants or orders for the delivery of goods, or any other documents used in the ordinary course of business as proof of the possession or control of goods, or authorizing or purporting to authorize, either by endorsement or by delivery, the possessor of such document to transfer or receive goods thereby represented...
Page 586 - The vessels referred to in this Article shall not be obliged to carry the lights prescribed by Article 4 (a) and Article 11, last paragraph. Art. 8. Pilot vessels, when engaged on their station on pilotage duty, shall not show the lights required for other vessels, but shall carry a white light at the masthead, visible all round the horizon, and shall also exhibit a flare-up light or flare-up lights at short intervals, which shall never exceed fifteen minutes.
Page 588 - ... which must, if both keep on their respective courses, pass clear of each other. The only cases to which it does apply are when each of two vessels is end on, or nearly end on, to the other; in other words, to cases in which, by day, each vessel sees the masts of the other in a line, or...
Page 589 - In obeying and construing these Rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special circumstances which may render a departure from the above Rules necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.
Page 589 - I am directing my course to starboard." Two short blasts to mean, "I am directing my course to port.
Page 275 - Every consignee of goods named in a bill of lading, and every indorsee of a bill of lading to whom the property in the goods therein mentioned shall pass, upon or by reason of such consignment or indorsement, shall have transferred to and vested in him all rights of suit, and be subject to the same liabilities in respect of such goods as if the contract contained in the bill of lading had been made with himself.
Page 201 - The distinction is very clear, where mutual covenants go to the whole of the consideration on both sides, they are mutual conditions, the one precedent to the other. But where they go only to a part, where a breach may be paid for in damages, there the defendant has a remedy on his covenant, and shall not plead it as a condition precedent.
Page 588 - ... to cases in which, by day, each vessel sees the masts of the other in a line, or nearly in a line, with her own; and by night, to cases in which each vessel is in such a position as to .see both the side lights of the other.
Page 588 - ... (c.) When both are running free, with the wind on different sides, the vessel which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.
Page 584 - ... points abaft the beam on the starboard side ; and of such a character as to be visible on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, at a distance of at least two miles. (c.) On the...

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