A treatise of the passions and faculties of the soule of man

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Page 509 - I take not wit in that common acceptation, whereby men understand some sudden flashes of conceit whether in style or conference, which, like rotten wood in the dark, have more shine than substance, whose use and ornament are, like themselves, swift and vanishing, at once both admired and forgotten. But I understand a settled, constant and habitual sufficiency of the understanding, whereby it is enabled in any kind of learning, theory, or practice, both to sharpness in search...
Page 320 - ... as Sir John Doddridge saith, " is almost alone sufficient to make a ready and able lawyer. This solidity of judgment teacheth to weigh and try the particulars apprehended, and to sever for us the precious from the vile. * • • Nothing is more prejudicial to it than precipitancy and impatience of delay or attendance on the determination of right reason, which makes us commonly run away with half or a broken judgment; in which respect Aristotle in his Ethics very elegantly compares it to a hasty...
Page 431 - ... naturall Reason and Observation framed for the compassing of a Mans just ends, and also for Prevention and 19 disappointment of such inconveniences as may hinder them. Lastly, for the Attribute of Knowledge, It was doubtlesse after a most eminent manner at first infused into the Heart of Man, when hee was able by Intuition of the Creatures to give unto them all Names, according to their severall Properties and Natures; and in them to shew himselfe, as well a Philosopher, as a Lord. Hee filled...
Page 500 - Some melancholy men have believed that elephants and birds and other creatures have a language whereby they discourse with one another. Reynolds, Passions and Faculties of the Soul, o.
Page 307 - ... a weakness and betrayer of the mind, is yet generally an argument of a soul ingenuously and virtuously disposed.
Page 56 - Fall and an indication of the possibility of redemption is to be seen everywhere : There is in Man, by reason of his general Corruption, such a distemper wrought, as that there is not onely crookednesse in, but dissension also, and fighting betweene his parts : And, though the Light of our Reason be by Man's Fall much dimmed and decayed ; yet the remainders thereof are so adverse to our unruly Appetite, as that it laboureth against us.
Page 453 - ... so much light of Divine Knowledge as should fit him to have Communion with God, and to serve him, and obtaine a blessed life; so much of Morall Knowledge as should 16 fit him to converse in Love as a Neighbour, in Wisedome as a Father, with other men; so much of Naturall Knowledge as should dispose him for the Admiring of Gods Glory, and for the Governing of other Creatures over which hee had received Dominion; so much wee may not without notable injurie to the perfection of Gods Workmanship,...
Page 179 - We love our food when it is meate, we loathe it when it is excrement. When it goes into us we desire it, when it passeth through we despise it.
Page 55 - Man continued intire and incorrupt, there was a sweet harmonie between all his Faculties, and such an happie subordination of them each to other, as that every Motion of the Inferiour Power was directed and governed. . . . But, when once Man had tasted of that murthering Fruit, and poyson'd him and all his Posteritie; then began those Swellings, and inward Rebellions, which made him as lame in his Naturall, as dead in his Spirituall Condition. Whence Passions are become, now in the state of Corruption,...
Page 431 - ... epistemological. Once again Reynolds can help us to understand the viewpoint of the informed centre, from which the genius of Marlowe or Bacon, or even Milton, can be seen only as aberrant : ... for albeit, the fall and corruption of Nature hath darkned his eyes, so that hee is enclined to worke Confusedly, or to walk as in a Maze, without Method or Order (as in a Storme the Guide of a Vessell is oftentimes to seek of his Art, and forced to yeeld to the windes and waves) yet certaine it is that...

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