A treatise on canals and reservoirs: and the best mode of designing and executing them; with observations on the Rochdale, Leeds and Liverpool, and Huddersfield canals ... Likewise observations on the best mode of carding, roving, drawing and spinning all kinds of cotton twist. Also instructions for designing and building a corn mill ... together with important directions on public drains

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Printed for the author, by J. Hartley, 1816 - Business & Economics - 413 pages
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Page 68 - ... have exhibited small models of water wheels and steam engines by which they have pretended to shew the best mode of applying the powers of those two great agents of nature. By these paltry models and the representations given of them the public have been greatly misled; and large sums of money have been expended to no purpose in making water wheels after such imperfect models. I know a number of good water wheels, judiciously constructed, well speeded, and the water systematically applied that...
Page 17 - The same year an English millwright made a similar observation: 'Mule spinning is certainly a very complex business which may still be considered in its infancy, for its machinery admits of e.ndless improvement, and it is one of the disagreeable but unavoidable circumstances attending it that the most ingenious spinner can never say he is spinning upon the best principle for six months together' [72] . In some instances Crompton's MSS.
Page 62 - A horse would find employment for four spinners, and a room six yards square would be sufficient for the card room; another room containing 60 [square] yards would be sufficient for the [spinning] wheels. Here would be a factory large enough to employ a moderate family and three or four additional hands; and how much better would it be for the children to be employed under their parents than in a large factory as they would be in no danger of contracting bad habits .... The capital required would...
Page 62 - The same building frequently included hand operated jennies or mules, and sometimes a few looms. John Sutcliffe, a Halifax millwright who had an extensive practice in the north of England, was pointing to the economic and social advantages of this type of factory as late as 1816: 'A horse would find employment for four spinners, and a room six yards square would be sufficient for the card room; another room containing 60 [square] yards would be sufficient for the [spinning] wheels. Here would be...
Page 248 - ... consequence of so many water mills, the country is never free from litigations and vexatious law suits, respecting erecting, repairing, or raising millweirs, by which the peace and harmony of neighbors and friends are often destroyed."17 He added: "Some years ago, the annual expense of water cases and arbitrations, in consequence of them, in the counties of York and Lancaster, were estimated at 10,000, and should trade revive, it is probable in a few years they will exceed this sum."18 A contemporary...
Page vi - ... pounds. The writer does not wish it to be understood that this is the whole of the art or science of shoveling. There are many other elements which together go to make up this science. But he wishes to indicate the important effect which this one piece of scientific knowledge has upon the work of shoveling. At the works of the Bethlehem Steel Company, for example, as a result of...
Page 122 - ... the slavery of working vessels through the tunnel is much greater than working upon the hulks, as the men have generally to lie on their backs, and paw with their feet, against the top, or sides of the tunnel for three hours and upwards, till they have pushed the vessel through, Mr.
Page 135 - So unbounded have the speculations in canals been that neither hills nor dales, rocks nor mountains could stop their progress, and whether the country afforded water to supply them or mines...
Page 83 - Kochdale canal) sink one inch per day, when the cocks are shut close, and yet I think no reservoirs are more water-tight than they. But I will only estimate upon the reservoirs wasting half an inch per day, and confine it to those on Blackstonedge, as that at Hollingswork gives a certain quantity of water constantly to the mill owners, which makes it difficult to ascertain how much it wastes.
Page 246 - Sutcliffe complained early in the 1800s: "1n consequence of so many water mills, the country is never free from litigations and vexatious law suits, respecting erecting, repairing, or raising millweirs, by which the peace and harmony of neighbors and friends are often destroyed."17 He added: "Some years ago, the annual expense of water cases and arbitrations, in consequence of them, in the counties of York and Lancaster, were estimated at 10,000, and should trade revive, it is probable...

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