A Treatise on Diagnostic Methods of Examination

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Saunders, 1911 - Diagnosis - 1229 pages
 

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Page 3 - Sahli, Director of the Medical Clinic, University of Bern. Edited, with Additions, by Nathaniel Bowditch Potter, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at Columbia University (College of Physicians and Surgeons), New York; Visiting Physician to the New York City Hospital, to the French Hospital, and to the Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled.
Page 470 - Radtol (ordinal nnmbers) the first the second the third the fourth the fifth the sixth the seventh the eighth the ninth the tenth the eleventh the twelfth the thirteenth the fourteenth the fifteenth the sixteenth the seventeenth the eighteenth the nineteenth the twentieth the twenty-first...
Page 638 - ... the centrifugal method in general use. In brief, the centrifugal method in general use is as follows : the soil is carefully sampled and a part of the sample which passes through a 2-millimeter sieve is used for analysis. Five grams are usually taken and dried at 110 C. This sample is then shaken with water, to which a few drops of ammonia have been added, for six hours or more. The sample is then placed in tubes and centrifuged until all but the clay particles have subsided ; these, with the...
Page 534 - ... enzymes is often successful and may be serviceable in the examination of mucopurulent particles of the movement which have been isolated from the mass of feces. We do not know whether under certain conditions decomposition will destroy tubercle bacilli in the intestine. At any rate, we cannot always demonstrate tubercle bacilli in the stools, even when there is undoubted intestinal tuberculosis. Perhaps this is on account of the dilution of the content of tubercle bacilli by the abundant particles...
Page 653 - Place 25 cc of urine in an aerometer cylinder, 30-40 cm. in height, add about 1 gram of dry sodium carbonate and introduce some crude petroleum to prevent foaming. Insert into the neck of the cylinder a rubber stopper provided with two perforations, into each of which passes a glass tube, one of which reaches below the surface of the liquid. The shorter tube (10 cm. in length) is connected with a calcium...
Page 523 - World hook-worm (Uncinaria americana), in the one-, two-, and four- cell stages. The egg showing three cells is a lateral view of a four-cell stage. These eggs are found in the feces of patients and give a positive diagnosis of infection. Greatly enlarged. (After Stiles.) ventral, are situated deep within the oral capsule.
Page 318 - Creighton, done in my clinic during the summer of 1899, showed that in 90 per cent of healthy children under ten years of age, the puLmonic second sound is louder than the aortic. In the next decade (from the tenth to the twentieth year) the pulmonic second sound is louder in two-thirds of the cases. About half of 207 cases, between the ages of twenty and twenty-nine, showed an accentuation of the pulmonic second, while after the thirtieth year the number of cases showing...
Page 611 - ... is dichroic, ie, in reflected light, greenish; by transmitted light, reddish. A permanent brown-red color gradually appears upon the addition of ferric chlorid solution. Detection of Phenacetin (acetphenetedin). — The urine is dark yellow and turns reddish-brown on the addition of ferric chlorid solution. The color gradually becomes black after prolonged standing. Detection of Antifebrin. — The urine is extracted with chloroform, and to the extract mercuric nitrate is added. The mixture is...
Page 711 - One gram of fuchsin or gentian violet is mixed with 10 cc. of absolute alcohol and 100 cc. of a 5 per cent, solution of carbolic acid...
Page 263 - ... both resonance and respiration may be wanting. But, in a certain number of cases where the effusion is quite large, if an accurate line be drawn, the flatness will be found to describe a curve, gradually approaching the spine toward the base of the chest, having a space from one to three or more inches broad between the spine and the line of flatness. In this space, resonance will still be detected, and respiration heard.

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