A Treatise on Diseases of the Anus, Rectum, and Pelvic Colon

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D. Appleton, 1906 - Rectum - 963 pages
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Contents

Rectum descending posterior to the anus and the latter opening into the vagina Amussat
60
Atresia ani vcsicalis
62
Atresia ani urethralis
64
Atresia ani preputialis
65
Atresia ani vaginalis
66
Malformation in which the peritoneal culdesac extends between the blind ends of the rectum and anus
71
CHAPTER III
94
Commode for office use
99
Left lateral or Simss posture
100
Exaggerated lithotomy position
101
Incorrect kneechest posture
102
Patient held in kneechest posture by straps and bands
103
Patient held in kneechest posture on Martin chair
104
The Little officelounge closed
105
Electric headlight
113
Kelseys rectal speculum
114
Gants operating rectal speculum
115
Van Burens rectal speculum
116
Kellys proctoscope
117
Kellys set of instruments for examining the rectum and sigmoid
119
Kellys rectal curette
120
Tuttles modification of Kellys sigmoidoscope
121
Lawss pneumatic proctoscope
122
Tuttles pneumatic proctoscope
123
Tuttles long sigmoidoscope with flexible obturator giving the instrument the Mercier curve
124
Tuttles silver probe
126
Tuttles dressingforceps
127
Waless softrubber rectal bougie
128
Rectal bougie a boule
129
CHAPTER IV
139
Tuttles rectal irrigator
144
CHRONIC COLITIS MUCOUS COLITIS MEMBRANOUS COLITIS
167
CHAPTER VI
193
Gonorrhoeal proctitisChancroid of the anusChancroidal ulceration of
253
CHAPTER IX
291
Abdominoanal extirpation Sigmoid is brought down through everted
297
CHAPTER X
319
CHAPTER XI
353
FIGURE PAOB 125 Transverse section of tubercular fistula photomicrograph
375
Allingbains ligaturecarrier
380
Ligature passed through fistula and secured
381
Fistula in which the internal opening A is in a different quadrant from that in which the abscess cavity B is nearest the rectal wall and show ing how p...
383
Mathewss fistulotome
384
Clovers crutch
386
Brodies probepointed grooved director
387
Needles for rectal surgery actual size
388
Grooved director passed through fistulous tract and showing how passing a bistoury along the groove and cutting outward will divide the sphinc ter ...
389
Fistula laid open outside of sphincter so that the latter can be cut squarely across
390
First step in excision of fistula
392
Removal of a fistula threaded upon a probe
393
Method of introducing the sutures after excision of fistula
394
Final step in closing fistula
395
Rectal portion of fistula closed by flap of mucous membrane
396
Yshaped blind internal fistula
399
Director passing through internal and external openings of fistula and leaving part of tract untouched
400
Fistulous tract passing through external sphincter
401
Subtegumentary fistula involving ischiorectal and retrorectal spaces
402
Long fistulous tract opening near the greater trochanter
403
Tract of horseshoe fistula operated on in September 1901
405
Dumbbell fistula
406
Oblique incision of sphincter which is frequently followed by inconti nence 2 Transverse incision not likely to result in same
413
On the left is shown the separation and lengthening of the muscle 1 to
414
Old method of repairing sphincter
415
Chetwoods operation for ficcal incontinencefirst step
417
Chetwoods operationsecond step
418
FISTULA DefinitionClassificationFrequencyEtiologyDiagnosisAnatomical charac
420
Rectourethral fistula 1 Tract running downward and backward prob ably originating in urethra 2 Tract running downward and forward probably ori...
426
Rectum perineum and urethra incised to expose rectourethral fistula
434
Rectourethral fistula and wound in the rectum closed The incision in the urethra anterior to the fistula is left open
435
Final step in operation for rectourethral fistula
436
Resection of the urethra for rectourethral fistula
437
Rectovesicovaginal fistula The fistulous tract indicated by the dotted line passed around the cervix and not through it
440
Fistulas originating in bone diseaseFistulas connecting rectum with other
446
Allinghams haemorrhoid crusher
646
Allinghams forceps for use in crushing operation 647 211 Smiths haemorrhoid crusher
647
First step in modified Whitehead operation for hemorrhoids
650
Second step in modified Whitehead operation
651
Third step in modified Whitehead operation
652
Earles forceps
655
Limited excision of hemorrhoids
656
Exstrophy of mucous membrane following faulty Whitehead operation
657
Strangulated haemorrhoids
659
Predisposing causesExciting causesNomenclatureClassificationExternal
666
Incomplete prolapse of the rectum
668
Complete procidentia rectifirst degree
672
Complete procidentia rectithird degree
673
Complete prolapse of the rectum showing circular arrangement of the rugae
674
Rectal hernia or archocele
676
Delormes operation for procidentia recti
688
Delormes operation completed showing reduplication of rectal wall
689
Infolding of the gut in Peterss operation for procidentia recti 690 230 Attachment of the gut to the abdominal wall in Peterss operation
690
Rectopexy for procidentia rectithe incision
691
Rectopexythe gut inverted and brought through the incision the su tures passed through its muscular walls
692
Rectopexythe sutures out through the tissues on each side of the sacrum
693
Rectopexythe operation completed
694
Rectal hernia protruding through the anus
706
Rectal hernia same case as Fig 235 protruding through vagina
707
Myxoma rectal polyp
713
Ladinskis rectal snare
715
Fibroids of the anus and rectum Drawn from photograph taken before operation 1894 Nine distinct tumors were removed
716
Myxoma Stengel
722
Multiple adenomata of the rectum
728
Hypertrophic folliculitis of rectum and colon Lilienthals case
729
Lymphoadenoma
733
Papilloma with cylindrical epithelioma Quenu and Hartmann
739
Schematic illustration of rectal papilloma
740
Papilloma of rectum
741
Villous polyp of the rectum Ball
744
A Congenital postanal fissure 247 B Congenital postanal dimple Mar koe and Schley Am Jour of Med Sci May 1902
752
Connectivetissue typeMuscular typeEpithelial typePolypusSeat
759
Epithelioma
767
Adenoid cancer
768
Medullary cancer
769
CHAPTER XX
810
rectum and sutured after method of Weir
844
Final steps in abdominoanal extirpation Peritoneal cavity closed intes tinal tract restored and drainagetube fixed in retrorectal space
845
Exposure of hemorrhoidal and sigmoidal artery in abdominal extirpation of the rectum
849
CHAPTER XXI
859
Line of incision in lumbar colostomy
864
Lumbar colostomy completed
865
Incision in inguinal colostomy
870
Inguinal colostomy
872
Crosssection after colostomy by Allinghams method
874
Scirrhus of intestine 770
875
Enterotomy after colostomy by Bodines method
876
Crosssection after colostomy by MaydlReclus method
877
Temporary inguinal colostomy Gut supported on rod and sutures in position
878
Dupuytrens enterotome
879
Murphy button open
880
OHaras clamps
881
Sutures introduced over forceps OHara
882
Lateral enteroanastomosis second step in OHaras method
883
Lateral enteroanastomosis completed OHaras method 884 330 Closure of artificial anus by plastic method
885
Crosssection after extraperitoneal closure of artificial anus
886
Ligature thrown around proximal loop of gut in colostomy in order to secure fecal control
887
Witzels method of colostomy
888
Baileys method of permanent colostomy
889
Brauns method of permanent colostomy Bryant
890
Permanent colostomy authors method
891
Mortality from colostomyStatistical tableLumbar colostomyInguinal
892
Permanent colostomy completed by authors method
893
CHAPTER XXIV
922
CHAPTER XXV
930
Index 939961
939
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Page 976 - OBSTETRICS. — A Text-Book for the Use of Students and Practitioners. By J. Whitridge Williams, Professor of Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University; Obstetrician-in-Chief to the Johns Hopkins Hospital; Gynecologist to the Union Protestant Infirmary, Baltimore, Md. Octavo; 845 pages. With Eight Colored Plates and Six Hundred and Thirty Illustrations in the Text.
Page 974 - INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF MEDICINE BY GH ROGER PROFESSOR EXTRAORDINARY IN THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE OF PARIS MEMBER OF THE BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY PHYSICIAN TO THE HOSPITAL OF PORTE-D* AUBERVILLIERS AUTHORIZED TRANSLATIONS BY MS GABRIEL, MD WITH ADDITIONS BY THE AUTHOR 8vo.
Page 586 - The LORD will smite thee with the botch of Egypt, and with the emerods, and with the scab, and with the itch, whereof thou canst not be healed.
Page 653 - The mucous membrane above the haemorrhoids is now divided transversely in successive stages, and the free margin of the severed membrane above is attached as soon as divided to the free margin of the skin below by a suitable number of sutures, ua The complete ring of pile-bearing mucous membrane is thus removed.
Page 652 - By the use of scissors and dissecting forceps, the mucous membrane is divided at its junction with the skin round the entire circumference of the bowel, every irregularity of the skin being carefully followed.
Page 971 - AM, MD Professor of Clinical Medicine and Diseases of the Chest, College of Physicians and Surgeons (Medical Department of the Illinois State University), Chicago...
Page 586 - And it was so, that, after they had carried it about, the hand of the LORD was against the city with a very great destruction: and he smote the men of the city, both small and great, and they had emerods in their secret parts.
Page 973 - Authorized translation from the Sixth German edition. Edited with annotations, by Julius L. Salinger, MD, Late Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Jefferson Medical College, and Physician to the Philadelphia Hospital.
Page 652 - The patient, previously prepared for the operation and under the complete influence of an aiwsthetic, is placed on a high, narrow table in the lithotomy position, and maintained in this position either by a couple of assistants or by Clover's crutch. " 2. The sphincters are thoroughly paralyzed by digital stretching, so that they have ' no grip,' and permit the haemorrhoids and any prolapse there may be to descend without the slightest impediment.
Page 974 - ... application of scientific procedures, diagnosis and prognosis, therapeutics, etc. An immense amount of work is evidenced by the text, and much careful and scholarly research. A book of this kind is needed, and will be particularly appreciated by those who, without undervaluing the importance of laboratory investigations, .still think clinical methods and the simpler means of reaching a diagnosis and prognosis should not be forgotten or slighted.

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